rssreader.neilforker.com’s Saved Items http://rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Shaun Inman’s Fever http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss <![CDATA[3 Tools You Can Use to Find a Font from an Image]]> Fonts play a key role in your website’s design and usability. At some point, you’ve probably seen a typeface in someone else’s photo, graphic, or logo and wished you knew its name so you could use it yourself. Fortunately, the next time you want to find a font from an image, you’ll have the tools on hand to do so.

There are several handy font-finding platforms you can put to work to improve your designs. In this article, we’ll introduce you to three automated online tools and compare them for accuracy. Plus, we’ll discuss some alternative methods you can try as well.

Let’s get to work!

How Font Finders Work

There’s a whole field of tools dedicated to helping designers identify the fonts they see in images. In a nutshell, they’re able to do so by recognizing text in an image and trying to match it to typefaces in their databases.

This approach works, in practice, but the success rate of the font matching process is limited by several factors, including:

  • The size of the tool’s font database
  • Whether your image is easily ‘readable’
  • If the text is horizontal or not

If you upload an image with text even a human would have a hard time making out, you’re not going to have much luck with an automated font finder. The same goes for the orientation of the letters – if you have to turn your head to read them, an online tool won’t be able to identify them.

3 Tools You Can Use to Find a Font from an Image

When it comes to online tools that can find a font from an image, there are three that are particularly popular: Matcherator, WhatTheFont, and What Font Is. To check out how well they work, we’re going to test each of them using two screenshots taken from some of our favorite Divi layouts.

1. Matcherator

Since we already covered how font finders work in broad terms, we’ll jump right into the specifics. When you visit the Matcherator homepage, here’s what you’ll see:

The Matcherator homepage.

You can click on the Upload Image button or drag your file from your desktop to get started. Matcherator will then ask you to crop it so it focuses on the text you want to identify. Here’s the first image we’re using for testing:

Divi's high fashion layout.

After uploading it to Matcherator, we cropped it to focus on the heading that reads “High Fashion”. It uses the Georgia font:

Cropping an image in Matcherator.

After you’re finished cropping your image, Matcherator returns a list of potential typefaces:

Matcherator's results.

As you can see, the results for our example weren’t exact matches to Georgia. However, Matcherator did accurately identify that it’s a serif font, and the second typeface it listed isn’t too far off.

We took Matcherator on a second test drive with an image that reads “OKAPE” and uses the famous Helvetica font:

Running a second test using Matcherator.

Once again, Matcherator returned mixed results. Some (although not all) of them were fairly close, but none were an exact match to Helvetica. If you want to find a specific font from an image but would be satisfied with a typeface that has a similar look, this tool could work well enough.

2. WhatTheFont

WhatTheFont operates almost exactly like Matcherator. First, it asks you to upload an image:

Uploading an image to WhatTheFont.

Then you’ll need to identify the section of the image that includes the font you want the tool to focus on. However, WhatTheFont has a text detection feature that can automatically select the appropriate area for you, saving you a bit of time.

You should only have to manually crop your image if it includes multiple typefaces or WhatTheFont otherwise can’t pinpoint the text you’re trying to use. As far as accuracy goes, this tool couldn’t outright identify Georgia either. However, the results are even closer than Matcherator’s:

Potential WhatTheFont results.

We also tested WhatTheFont with our “OKAPE” image. Keep in mind that this text is all uppercase, which should make the process a lot easier for the software:

Running a second test using WhatTheFont.

Although WhatTheFont didn’t identify Helvetica either, the results it shows us are almost identical to the original we uploaded. If you’re trying to find a font from an image you could get very close to an exact match with this tool.

3. What Font Is

Like the other tools we’ve covered, as soon as you visit What Font Is, it will ask you to upload an image it can analyze:

The What Font Is homepage.

You’ll then crop the portion of your image containing the font you want to find:

Cropping an image for What Font Is.

At this point, What Font Is includes some additional steps to gather more information about your image. First, it will ask you to make some edits to your cropped selection:

Modifying a cropped selection in What Font Is.

On this screen, you’ll need to:

  • Draw lines to separate each character
  • Make sure the text is darker than the background (click on Invert if it’s not)
  • Adjust the contrast and brightness to make the text as visible as possible
  • Rotate the image so the text is horizontal

Next, What Font Is will ask you to identify specific characters in your text:

Identifying characters in What Font Is.

Finally, you’ll get to see your results:

Results from What Font Is.

Unfortunately, all that extra work didn’t really bring us any closer to an exact match than WhatTheFont. However, the results do look very similar to our image’s text, and What Font Is has some bonus search features you may find handy.

Using the tabs to the right of your original image, you can narrow your results to commercial, free, or Google Fonts typefaces. This will help you easily find options for your design that are within your budget.

We also tried our “OKAPE” image with What Font Is, and received a similar outcome. Once again, Helvetica was not among the suggested typefaces, but there were several very close contenders:

Results from What Font Is.

Overall, What Font Is can be a useful tool if you want to find a free typeface or Google Font that looks a lot like the one in your image. However, WhatTheFont is equally accurate and requires less work on your end.

Online Font-Finding Communities

Trying to find an exact font from an image using an online tool is a lot harder than you might imagine. There are thousands of free and premium typefaces. No single platform has access to a database that encompasses all of them or algorithms that can accurately identify them consistently.

In our experience with font finders, WhatTheFont does the best job of giving you results similar to the text it analyzes. As long as you upload images that are easy to read and you help it along a little bit by making sure it crops the right section, you should get some solid suggestions.

On the other hand, there might be circumstances where you absolutely need to identify a specific font. If that’s the case, you might have better luck crowdsourcing the answer. Fortunately, there are entire online communities devoted to this task.

Two of the best include Reddit’s IdentifyThisFont and Quora’s Typeface Identification. All you have to do is ask nicely and upload an example of the font you’re trying to name. Usually, someone will come along with the right answer (even if it’s very obscure).

Conclusion

There are plenty of online tools you can use to find a font from an image. In general terms, however, they’re only as accurate as the databases they use. Moreover, you need to submit images where the text is easy to read. Otherwise, your results will be all over the place.

Out of all the services we tested, WhatTheFont returned the closest results to our original text. If you’re dead set on identifying a specific typeface, you might have better luck outsourcing the task to online communities such as IdentifyThisFont or Typeface Identification.

Do you have any questions about how to find a font from an image? Let’s go over them in the comments section below!

Article thumbnail image by DRogatnev / shutterstock.com

The post 3 Tools You Can Use to Find a Font from an Image appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

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<![CDATA[10 Things Your Father Should Have Taught You About Style]]>

With our archives now 3,500+ articles deep, we’ve decided to republish a classic piece each Friday to help our newer readers discover some of the best, evergreen gems from the past. This article was originally published in November 2018.

There’s something very old-fashioned and almost kitschy about the idea of a father teaching his son how to dress like a man.

Part of that, of course, is because a lot of fathers these days don’t really know how to dress themselves, so there isn’t much for them to pass along.

For those of you who never had a style mentor in your father, here are all the lessons a really well-dressed dad would have passed along. Better late than never!

1. Style Matters

This is one that’s often not taught explicitly. Instead, fathers reinforce the idea simply by the act of teaching their sons — it’s implied that, because Dad is spending time on this stuff, it must matter.

It’s a good lesson to internalize. Style matters, both as an individual and as a part of a family.

People do judge you based on your appearance. If you believe otherwise, you’re just kidding yourself. You want to be a good person, absolutely — but no matter how good you are, you’re not going to be judged by the quality of your character until people have had a chance to observe it for a while. Until then, they’re going off of appearances.

That makes it crucial for everyone who wants to be taken seriously to present himself well. And fathers who want their sons to do well — and who want their family to be respected — will be sure to pass that lesson along.

2. Individual Pieces of Clothing Can Be Special

The bond between father and son isn’t always intangible. Sometimes, it comes in the form of treasured physical objects passed on from one generation to the next.

The best of these are the “they just don’t make ’em like they used to” pieces from brands that no longer exist, or that changed their manufacturing processes.

You don’t need to have actually received something from your father to enjoy keeping it in good shape and wearing it long after all the others are gone. There’s a thriving culture of restored vintage clothing out there these days.

Some of it is pure economic good sense — if you can spend less money to restore a better piece of clothing than you would buying something similar and less durable new, why wouldn’t you? But some of it also stems from the pride and emotional attachment that really caring for a favored item gives.

Don’t be afraid to be the guy with the battered old favorite, whatever it is. Know when to wear it and when not to, of course (something with obvious repair work and patching isn’t exactly business attire), but don’t be afraid to let those sentimental attachments build.

3. Dressing Well Is Easy — If You Have a System

Dads are supposed to show you the best way to do things, right?

That relies on your dad actually knowing the best way to do things. Sometimes they do and sometimes — as we discover when we grow older — they don’t.

But here’s the easy way to dress well that all fathers should teach their sons: have a system. Reduce obstacles. Make it the path of least resistance to look good.

It doesn’t take much to make dressing well your easiest option. Throw out the stuff that doesn’t fit or that looks sloppy. Then buy new clothes as needed, with an eye toward interchangeability. You want every new item you bring home to go well with at least some of the items already in your closet. If you need even more structure than that, you can make a list of which pieces go well together, or even plan your outfits day by day.

Keep your wardrobe ready-to-wear too. Iron your shirts right after you launder them, so you can just grab one off the hangar whenever you need to. Place items like a clothing brush and your shoeshine kit close to the clothing you use them with — you’re much more likely to say, “Oh, hey, time to shine the shoes,” if you’re looking right at the polish and brushes every time you put your shoes away.

It’s not about making yourself do something you want. It’s about making what you want the easiest thing to do.

4. Buy Quality

There are a couple of investments you can make when clothes shopping.

You can spend money on a brand name. You can spend money on a fashionable design. Or you can spend money on the physical quality of the piece — how it fits, what it’s made of, and how well-constructed the finished garment is.

A responsible father will always tell his son to prioritize quality. Everything else is secondary.

This is aesthetic as well as practical. A better-made garment doesn’t just last longer (getting you more value for your dollar) — it also looks better.

Don’t believe it? Visit somewhere with a wide range of clothes. A big menswear store like Jos. A. Bank or Men’s Wearhouse will work. They don’t have the highest quality suits, but they’ll have “Executive Collections” or something similarly-named that are quite a bit more expensive than the entry-level clothing.

Look at the difference between the high end and the low end. Just hanging on the rack, you can already see a pronounced improvement in the drape, the hand-feel, and the luster of the more expensive fabrics.

That’s what you want to be spending money on. You want clothes that last, clothes that don’t look cheap and flimsy, and — of course — clothes that fit. If that means spending a little more for better fabrics and stores that do in-house adjustments, that’s a small price to pay.

And it’s money much better spent than shelling out for a brand name or a fashion trend! Trust your father — and us — on that one.

5. Take a Good Deal When You See One

There’s a difference between a sale and a bargain.

If you don’t know the difference, blame your dad. He should have taught you.

Sales are ubiquitous. They’re everywhere, and most of the time they’re fake. Retailers mark most of their items with two prices: a “standard” price that they never planned to sell the item at, and a “sale” price that they slapped on the tag as soon as it hit their shipping counter. The first number is just a fictional comparison point designed to make the second number seem like a special deal, instead of the default price that it really is.

So ignore “sale prices.” But every once in a while, a real deal does come along, and that’s when you shouldn’t be afraid to strike — even if it means spending a little more than you normally would.

Here’s how you tell if something is a real bargain: if it’s an item you already wanted, and it costs less than you’d expected to pay if-and-when you finally shelled out for one, it’s a bargain. If you didn’t want it, or it’s more expensive than your expectations, it’s probably not a great deal.

Finding those perfect opportunities is rare. Unless you’re a dedicated bargain-hunter, you’ll only see them once in a while. But when you do, go ahead and take them, even if it means spending a little more than you’d planned that month. A really good investment is always worth making.

6. Take Care of What You Own

Repairs are cheaper than replacement.

There’s a half-life on that equation, of course. We’ve all had cars hit the point where fixing them would cost more than the remaining lifespan of the car is worth.

But clothes, happily, don’t usually run into the same kind of massive expenses cars do. Even a major repair job is unlikely to run much over $100, unless the material or construction is something incredibly uncommon.

And while that’s not a negligible sum, it’s also less than a brand-new suit (or even a nice-quality jacket) costs.

So take a lesson from Dad, or from us, and maintain the things you have rather than replacing them with things you don’t have. Shoes, clothing, whatever — get it cleaned when you need to, do the little maintenance tasks that help stave off more expensive repairs, and when things get damaged, get them fixed.

This is good, solid, practical advice. It makes sense for your budget. But it’s also a point of pride. If you can’t take responsibility for your own clothing, how are you going to take responsibility for bigger, more important things in life?

Show a little self-reliance — the kind that would make Dad proud — and keep your clothing in shape and in the wardrobe for as long as the material can hold out.

7. Build a Relationship With Shops and Tailors

Small, locally-owned businesses have had a tough time of it all over, but the self-owned tailor’s shop is still hanging in there, as a concept, at least.

Make it part of your routine as a well-dressed man to rely on independent businessmen as much as possible. Avoid the big-box chain stores. They’re not good for anything, except low prices, and even then you’re usually getting something so cheaply-made that you end up losing money on replacement costs within a year or two.

Instead, shop less frequently, spend a little more, and try to both buy your clothing and have it altered by people you can get to know personally. You want places that have “lifers” — owners and employees who are dedicated to the business itself, not to a paycheck.

There’s an ethical component to that advice, but there’s also a practical one. Small, independent businesses are much more open to discussion, negotiation, and customization than big chain stores. At a chain store there are fixed policies that no one has the authority to contradict — they can only do what management says they can do.

Men and women who own their own businesses are free to work with the customer as much as they please. If you’re at all interested in building a customized wardrobe, whether it’s hand-tailored or not, it’s worth doing as much of your shopping as possible at places where you can build a flexible, personalized relationship.

8. It’s Better to Be Looked Over than Overlooked

There’s nothing wrong with being the best-dressed man in the room.

The concept of “overdressed” should be used very sparingly. If you’re actively making people uncomfortable (wearing an expensive business suit for a photo-op with homeless people, say — something more than one politician has done, and been criticized for), then you should think about toning it down. And special event clothing should be saved for special events — don’t wear a tuxedo to work.

But beyond that, there’s no real upper limit to how nice you can look. Feel like wearing a suit and tie during your weekend errands? Go for it. It’s not necessary, but it’s also not wrong.

Taking pride in how you look includes not being shy about dressing well. It doesn’t matter if the other men around you are doing it or not. You’re not responsible for their clothing — but you are responsible for yours.

9. Your Clothes Affect Your Mindset

Most dads don’t get too deep into the psychology, but “look like a winner and you’ll be a winner” is solidly within the realm of parental advice.

It also has the advantage of being true. You really can make yourself more successful by dressing better.

Clothes have what psychologists call a “talisman effect.” We associate them with specific images and ideas, regardless of who wears them.

In one study, participants who were given a white lab coat to wear performed better on scientific reasoning tests than participants in their street clothes — and when the experiment was repeated, but with the coat introduced to participants as an artist’s smock, the difference vanished. The people who believed they were dressed like a scientist became better scientists, and the people who believed they were dressed like an artist didn’t.

Your clothes can have the same effect for you. If you’re working from home and you find yourself wasting time on non-work activities, try dressing up in business clothes at the start of your work day. If you’re angling for a raise or a promotion, start dressing like the people at the level you aspire to. And so on — wear the clothes that represent the mindset you want, rather than the mindset you have. Change will follow.

10. Looking Good Takes Practice

One final piece of fatherly advice: if you want to be good at something, you have to practice, practice, practice.

That holds just as true for dressing well as anything else. No one is born a naturally sharp dresser, and anyone who thinks he was is kidding himself (and probably doing it to excuse some bad fashion choices).

Approach improving your image like you would any other project. Ask around for advice, read expert guides, and indulge in some trial-and-error.

And yes — there will be errors. You’ll make a few poor choices along the line. Maybe that’ll result in owning something you don’t wear much, because it turned out not to work for you, or maybe you’ll have a couple days where you look a little silly.

It’s not the end of the world. You’ll get better at it with practice. And if you stop trying, you won’t get any better.

So try hard, seek the advice you need, and when you fail try again — just like Dad would tell you to.

_________________________________________

Written By Antonio Centeno

Founder, Real Men Real Style

Click here to grab my free ebooks on men’s style

The post 10 Things Your Father Should Have Taught You About Style appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

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<![CDATA[Read These 5 Books to Get the Personal Finance Education You Never Had]]>

During your school years, you learn reading, writing, and arithmetic; history, philosophy, algebra; a little music, a little art, a little sports.  

What you typically don’t learn is anything about personal finance. Which is unfortunate, since it’s something you’ll use, and which will greatly affect both the macro trajectory and the day-to-day quality of your life, far more than your understanding of the quadratic equation and the Battle of Waterloo. 

Parents seldom fill this institutional learning gap, figuring their children will somehow absorb the principles of personal finance by osmosis. 

As a result, many young people reach adulthood having received very little personal finance education at all. This can prove greatly detrimental to their ability to move ahead in the world and achieve a state of financial stability and prosperity.

Fortunately, even though most of us were never given a personal finance education by others, it’s something we can obtain for ourselves. 

Below are the five personal finance books I recommend reading to create this kind of autodidactic “curriculum” for yourself. Together they’ll go a very long way in helping you get a handle on your finances and master your money.

The principles and ideas that these foundational books cover have a lot of overlap; there’s not a whole lot to the basics of personal finance: find ways to earn more money, spend less than you take in, budget, save for retirement, etc. But as with all self-development books, it’s helpful to read multiple sources on the same subject, as hearing the same principles repeated, in different voices, in different ways, helps ingrain them into your mind. 

At the same time, each book covers certain subjects in greater depth than others, and offers unique tips and angles that can make your approach to finances as well-rounded as possible. What you should end up doing is taking the bits from each book that most resonate and apply to your current circumstances, and mixing them together to form the best personal finance strategy for your individual goals. 

The Total Money Makeover by Dave Ramsey

Back in 2006 I had been married a year and was in my first year of law school. Kate had just finished a master’s degree. I vividly remember experiencing a moment of hopelessness about our money situation when I looked at all the student debt we had thus far accumulated, and realized the hole would only grow bigger as I made my way through law school and we lived on the meager income from my part-time job, and Kate’s adjunct teaching gig at a community college.

Enter Dave Ramsey and his famous book, The Total Money Makeover

I had seen people rave about it on personal finance blogs, so I bought a copy. After finishing it, I felt some hope that I could actually get ahead with my finances. 

Ramsey’s Total Money Makeover plan is pretty simple. It involves just 7 “baby steps”: 

Baby Step 1: $1,000 cash in a beginner emergency fund

Baby Step 2: Use the debt snowball to pay off all your debt but the house

Baby Step 3: A fully funded emergency fund of 3 to 6 months of expenses

Baby Step 4: Invest 15% of your household income into retirement

Baby Step 5: Start saving for college

Baby Step 6: Pay off your home early

Baby Step 7: Build wealth and give generously

The steps are actually pretty substantial, but they somehow seem more doable with the “baby” appellation!

The steps I found the most helpful were saving $1,000 cash for a beginner emergency fund, paying off all debt with the snowball method (in which you pay off the debt with the lowest balance first, and then apply what you had been paying towards it, to the next lowest debt), and then fully funding an emergency fund of 3 to 6 months of expenses. 

The debt snowball is probably the most powerful takeaway from the book. Some financial experts argue that paying off debt the way Ramsey recommends isn’t the best approach practically (prioritizing the payment of debts with the highest interest rate makes more sense), but psychologically, it works. At least it worked for me. After a few years of living very frugally, generating additional income from summer internships and the Art of Manliness (which was then a small side hustle), and snowballing right along, Kate and I were able to pay off all of our student loans and a car loan and start our lives debt free. 

I Will Teach You to Be Rich by Ramit Sethi

Don’t be fooled by the name of this book. It’s not a “how to get rich quick” book. Personal finance writer Ramit Sethi walks you through a six-week program designed to whip your finances into shape. A key component of the program is putting systems into place so that managing your money is as frictionless as possible. 

What I love most about this book is how specific Ramit gets. For example, he provides exact scripts to use to negotiate down credit card fees and cable expenses. He also recommends specific banks as well as automated systems to use so you save money without even thinking about it. 

I read the first edition of I Will Teach You to Be Rich back in 2009. (Ramit updated it in 2019 and we had him on the podcast to discuss the latest edition.) The book had a big impact on me: in it, Ramit recommended setting up an online bank account with ING Direct and creating a system of different accounts for automated savings goals. I did that back in 2009. ING is now part of Capital One and I still have and use that account. And while my savings goals have changed since then, I still use the basic system Ramit lays out in I Will Teach You to Be Rich.

Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties by Beth Kobliner

In Get a Financial Life, author and journalist Beth Kobliner explains the world of money in easy-to understand language. It’s more of a personal finance reference book than an advice book (though it also contains plenty of advice). 

Beth explains the very basics of how the banking system, health insurance, and retirement accounts work, what to look for in a bank, how to consolidate loans, what the home buying process is like, and much more. Pretty much any finance-related thing you’ll encounter as an adult, Beth covers it.



I still go back to this book every now and then when I need a refresher on a certain money concept. 

Your Money or Your Life by Vicki Robin and Joe Dominguez

The authors of Your Money or Your Life lay out a plan to become financially independent by reducing spending and investing in assets that grow income. Pretty simple. 

I never actually followed the specific investment advice in this book. In the original edition that I read back in college, the authors recommended socking your money into CDs and treasuries and living on the interest. That might have worked 25 years ago; not so much today. (They did update the book in 2018 and now recommend index funds.) 

While I never followed the exact financial tactics suggested in Your Money or Your Life, its overarching philosophy did change my overall mindset about money. It made the case for embracing frugality and rejecting mindless consumerism, and it helped me think about what I valued in life and realize that how I spend my money is tied to what I value. The book introduced me to the idea of “financial independence” and made it a goal that my family and I have been working towards ever since I read it nearly 15 years ago. 

The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing

After I paid off my debt, I shifted gears and started thinking about long-term investing and putting more money in the stock market. There’s a ton of advice out there on how to do that; so much so, that it sometimes feels like it would just be easier to not do anything and stuff your money under a mattress instead.

But reading The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing a decade ago gave me the confidence and knowledge I needed to cut through the noise and confusion and start investing.

The book distills the investing principles of Vanguard founder Jack Bogle. Bogle is credited as one of the originators of index fund investing

You won’t find super specific investing tactics in this book, but rather high-level, common-sense guidelines: invest for the long-term; don’t chase investment fads; keep your emotions out of your investing. 

While my specific investing tactics have changed over the years, I still follow the basic principles from this book. 

Additionally, we have many AoM resources that can also supplement your DIY personal finance education, including:

The post Read These 5 Books to Get the Personal Finance Education You Never Had appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

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<![CDATA[The Best Way to Promote Music in 2020]]> Over the past few months, I’ve received a handful of emails asking me the same impossible question:

“I love the blog, I’ve read all your articles, you’ve given me so many things to try… but if you had to pick just one, what’s the best way to promote my music?”

I bet you know the answer. Say it with me:

It depends.

Are you just starting out, or are you an established artist? Are you trying to turn a profit, or just build awareness? Are you promoting a new record, planning a tour, building a social media following, or trying to blow up on Spotify? What’s your promotion budget? Do you even have a promotion budget?

I’ve done Skype consultations with a handful of artists, and while it’s nice to know that I could still earn a living if something happened to my hearing, my top priority right now is to make music.

So let’s answer that impossible question by exploring some of the resources I’ve written about that are still relevant in 2020. Next time someone asks, I’ll point them here.

Unless otherwise mentioned, all links direct to my articles on the subject.

Conquering Spotify

Let’s start with what most of you care about the most. For better or worse, these days it feels like an artist’s success or lack thereof boils down to one number: Spotify monthly listeners.

To nudge that number up in any meaningful way, you’ll almost certainly have to spend money, and it’s unlikely that you’ll make that money back in streaming royalties.

If you’re more interested in social proof than in making fans, Virtuoso can deliver big numbers fast, but like Cinderella’s carriage, they’ll disappear in a puff of smoke once your campaign ends.

Playlist Push can put your music in front of an extraordinary number of playlist curators, but there’s no guarantee that any of them will add your track. I suggest testing the waters with curators on SubmitHub first, where you can spend as much or as little as you’d like before deciding if a Playlist Push campaign makes sense.

Midnite Blaster offers a more personalized approach to playlist pitching. They’ll work with you towards whatever goals you have in mind. Historically they’ve specialized in EDM but they’re branching out to other genres (no hip hop yet).

Ideally you want to reach people who genuinely want to hear your music, on playlists alongside artists you’d like to see in your Fans Also Like. Therein lies your best chance at algorithmic success.

At the very least, the services I recommend here are safe and won’t jeopardize your Spotify standing like others that use bots might. Be especially wary of any service that promises to deliver followers.

Instead of, or in addition to, hiring a Spotify PR company to get you on playlists, you can reach music fans on Spotify’s free tier directly through Spotify Ad Studio.

Speaking of which, the nice folks at Spotify liked my article enough to fly me out to Brooklyn for an interview!

What isn’t mentioned is that my ad wasn’t properly targeted due to a bug on their end, not my ineptitude. But hey, the advice still holds.

Here’s the main video. I first show up at 2:35, but don’t skip. It’s all good stuff.

Longtime readers of the blog will also recall that I spent $500 on a Deezer campaign, with promising short-term but nebulous long-term results. Until Deezer rolls out comprehensive artist analytics, I wouldn’t recommend it unless you really want to target France.

Building relationships

To make any money, you don’t just need listeners, you need actual fans, and a cost-effective way to put offers in front of them.

You know what that means: a mailing list! I recommend starting with Mailchimp, which is free up to 2000 subscribers. Beyond that, the price ramps up fast, so I use FanBridge. Passive Promotion readers can get a free 60-day trial here (normally it’s 30 days).

Both allow you to set up a drip campaign, which is an automated series of emails sent to new subscribers. It’s a great way to introduce people to your world in measured doses.

Selling music is tough these days, though some genres still do well on Bandcamp. Bandcamp can also handle merch, or alternately, you could set up a Shopify store. I haven’t had much luck in the merch department, but then again, I don’t perform.

The best way to find potential new fans is through Facebook and/or Instagram ads. Both are managed through the same interface.

One approach is to use download gates to gather email addresses, as John Gold of Hypeddit details in his Fans on Demand Formula course. The same method can be used to build an audience on Spotify, SoundCloud, YouTube, and social media.

Another technique is detailed in the Fan Finder Method from Indepreneur, which I’m currently working through. Essentially you run a Video Views campaign to a handful of mutually exclusive audiences in order to optimize Facebook’s targeting, then create a lookalike audience from those who watch a certain percentage of the video. Membership is cheap at only $37 per month for their entire suite of trainings, and you can get half off the first month with my affiliate link.

When it comes time to ask those potential fans to listen to your music, I use a Feature.fm Smart Link, which offers deeper analytics than competing services. You can create custom links for each of your campaigns to A/B test, and even create a conversion campaign optimized for clickthroughs to Spotify.

An alternate way to jumpstart your fanbase is to run a contest like I did with Gleam.

Other resources

We could all use a little perspective on our music. I don’t know about you, but when I finish a new song I almost always feel like it’s my best work yet. A couple weeks later, I’m not sure if I even want to release it!

If you can stomach a hearty dose of brutal honesty, I recommend two resources:

Drooble Reviews tend to be supportive, as they’re written by other independent musicians. They often include detailed technical suggestions to improve your track, so I recommend submitting works-in-progress.

ReverbNation’s Crowd Review works best as a market research platform. You’ll receive some uneducated and even downright rude comments, but it’s an inexpensive way to see how your song stacks up against others on the platform, or to pick which track from an album to promote as a single.

At some point you’ll want to sign up with Songtrust to ensure you get all the royalties you’re due.

Don’t try this at home

I’ve told you what to do, so now I’ll tell you what not to do: banner ads.

Seriously, don’t waste your money on banner ads of any kind, including Promote on Soundcloud. They don’t work.

This may come as a surprise, but I wouldn’t recommend Patreon for most artists.

Yes, it’s been my primary focus for almost three years now, but it’s a ton of work. You may think “if only 1% of my Instagram followers became patrons” but they won’t. I’ve seen artists with hundreds of thousands of Spotify monthly listeners launch pages with patron counts in the single digits.

How many fans do you have that reliably buy everything you put out? Maybe half of them would support you on Patreon if your offer is compelling enough. Less than 100 patrons probably isn’t worth your time and energy to maintain.

Last but not least, how many times have you scrolled through Instagram or Facebook to see an ad from an artist you’ve never heard of, announcing their new release? And how many times have you clicked through to listen?

Don’t be that artist. If you’re going to run that sort of ad, restrict it to warm audiences only. Strangers don’t care.

Conclusion

So yeah, that’s a lot of stuff. While I haven’t tried everything, I’ve also tried plenty that wasn’t worth writing about. As always, I’ve got a bunch of experiments in the works, and I’m totally open to your ideas.

Lay your suggestions on me in the comments and I’ll try out anything that sounds promising!

If you’d like to hear more of my promotional escapades, be sure to subscribe to my How I’m Promoting My Music This Month email newsletter.

Better yet, join me on Patreon for a behind-the-scenes look at my creative process and promotional efforts!

Artwork by Ody from an upcoming Color Theory release.

The post The Best Way to Promote Music in 2020 appeared first on Passive Promotion.

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<![CDATA[Here’s What Happened When I Wore a Tie to Work Every Day for a Year]]>

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Mark Richardson.

The Experiment

Just over a year ago, I started an engineering job at a local company where typical daily dress is a collared shirt and slacks. While scouting for something to wear on a random day in the first few weeks, I noticed a large number of ties in my closet. My wife and I had recently moved and made an ardent effort in packing and unpacking these clothing articles, so I decided to make these efforts worthwhile by knotting one on my neck for the day and determining to wear one the rest of the week. Around the office that week, I received the typical, sarcasm-laced questions of “When’s the interview?” and “Why are you dressed like that?” numerous times.

The next week, I was running late on Monday and decided to skip the tie in favor of regaining a few much-needed minutes. A peculiar situation occurred later in the day when the president of the company, whom I rarely interacted with, poked his head into my humble cube and asked where my tie was. I was floored and unable to answer, but his question made me ponder my wardrobe decisions. I had worn a tie for a single week and, as a result, the head of the company was keenly aware of my presence and appearance.

Consequently, I decided to run an amateur social experiment to see if one tiny strip of colored fabric could truly make a difference in my professional life. My experiment was simply to wear a tie to work every day for a year while occasionally donning a sport coat or blazer for good measure. As a non-senior engineer, I knew I was unable to change my years of experience immediately; however, I did have the ability to quickly change my appearance for the better.

The Results: The Benefits of Wearing a Tie Every Day

Before diving into this list, I would like to add that this was my personal experience with wearing a tie every day; I, of course, can’t guarantee this will happen to every reader. In addition, tie-wearing must accompany good work. A well-dressed sloth will never exceed the value of a shabbily-dressed industrious worker. That said, here are the benefits I recognized over the course of the year:

Increased Recognition Among Coworkers

A tie is a relatively small piece of clothing. And yet, the presence of one around your neck immediately separates you from the sea of unbuttoned collars. Even if your name is relatively unknown around the office or in departments you rarely frequent, others will notice and identify you by your clothing choice. Of course, recognition can be a double-edged sword. Some coworkers, especially aspiring managers, could see your upscaled dress as a threat — as a sign of your ambitions. Be aware of this, but take courage in knowing that as long as you don’t act in a pompous manner, these feelings will soon pass. In fact, instead of provoking antagonism, you may inspire your coworkers to dust off their own sport coats and ties to wear into work.

Greater Personal Confidence

The first day I came out of our bedroom sporting a tie, my wife did a double-take and said, “Wow you look nice!” Naturally, that made me feel marvelous and I held my head high the rest of the day. At work I received some comments as well, some sarcastic and some genuine, but the former gradually went away as I continued to wear the tie, and overall, I found that wearing a tie every day made me feel a greater sense of self-respect.

I soon realized that it wasn’t only the affirmations of others which constituted a change in my self-esteem. The self-discipline of willingly going the extra mile in my wardrobe choices and knowing I stood out among my peers and coworkers was enough to make me stand taller and walk straighter. In my experiment I felt a draw of prestige harkening back to the power suits of the 50s and 60s. While I offer no scientific proof, I can assure the reader that a man who feels he looks exceptional will exude confidence and dignity. On the flipside, a major drainer of confidence is having to acknowledge yourself as the most underdressed person in the room. With a tie, you’ll rarely be put in that situation and you can proudly and comfortably attend any client or internal meeting — even when it’s last minute.

While this article is directed at ties, I would like to put in a plug for the sport coat too. A well-fitting, waist-slimming, shoulder-broadening coat will enhance your appearance and make you stand out among other men around you (even ones who have a better physique but aren’t dressed as well).     

Heightened Responsibility

Not only can a tie, especially paired with a suit or sport coat, help you feel more confident yourself, it will also lead to others placing more confidence in you. This confidence can materialize in different forms, but it will commonly emerge in being given new responsibilities that lie outside your typical role or position. Perform these new obligations well, and the greater confidence lent you, born from wearing a simple tie, can quickly and easily set you far ahead of your peers.

Exposure to New Opportunities

Throughout my experiment I noticed I was picked among my peers to attend important client meetings and take on new projects. When I finally asked a supervisor why I was being chosen, he simply answered, “We know you will always be dressed appropriately to be in front of a client.”

Monetary Gains

Yearly performance reviews and raises came about midway through my experiment. A meeting with the office leader disclosed that I was getting the maximum raise percentage, which was only awarded to three people that year. This outmatched all my peers and some direct managers who outrank me. The office leader cited my “professionalism” as one of the main reasons for bestowing this sizable raise.

During the experiment, my company was going through some growing pains from their recent buyout. In my department, this meant an exodus of coworkers leaving for other firms coupled with large layoffs. As my experiment came to a close, I looked around and realized everyone with my title had either left the company or been laid off. I took this observation to the president of the company, wondering why I was left standing, and received the response of, “You’re the last person we would think of laying off.” As before, my “professionalism” was stated as a major reason for keeping me with the company.  

How to Wear a Tie Effectively

If you’re intrigued by my experiment, and considering wearing a tie more regularly yourself, here are some tips on how to do so with style, dash, and modesty.

Wear the Right Tie, the Right Way

Wearing the right tie in the right way is almost as important as wearing a tie in the first place. Neglecting to acknowledge the style considerations surrounding this accessory can result in an appearance that is immature, awkward, or slovenly. So read up on the following resources on how to wear a tie well:

Wear With Comfortable Confidence

My father once told me, “It’s very easy to tell if a man is at home in a suit.” This observation can be confirmed at weddings, funerals, proms, and Easter Sunday church service. Shifting uncomfortably, walking awkwardly, tugging on various choke points, and/or evincing a general air of discontent evidences that someone does not feel at home in a suit. You don’t want that same air of disconfidence when wearing a tie. Inspect your shirts to ensure that none of the collars are too tight when buttoned up; if they feel like a vice grip on your neck, collar extenders are particularly helpful and will be covered up by your tie.

Adjusting your garments may help, but feeling and looking natural in a tie will mainly come with experience. The more you wear a tie, the more comfortable you’ll feel in one, and the more comfortable you feel, the more confidence you’ll exude. 

Humility

If you want to kill any of the benefits detailed above, be sure to act pompous about your new wardrobe change. The goal of wearing a tie is not to feel superior to others, but rather to boost your personal professionalism and confidence. No one admires a boastful jerk. Instead, you should carry yourself with both self-assurance, and humility. When you receive questions about your tie, especially during the first few weeks, use the essence of the responses below:

  • “I have quite a few ties at home and I wanted to get some use out of them.”
  • “My wife likes it when I look sharp!”
  • “It’s just something I thought I’d experiment with.”

Don’t use answers such as these:

  • “I actually care about the way I look, unlike some people who work here.”
  • “People give respect to those who wear ties.”
  • “I read an article on AoM and it says I’ll be promoted faster than you and make more money if I do this.” 

Be Counter-Cultural

Upon entering the workforce a few years ago, the first comments I heard about dress code in an office were, “Anything above a dress shirt and slacks is not really part of office culture anymore,” and “If you go in an (insert industry here) office you won’t find anyone that wears a tie or coat anymore so you shouldn’t either.” The truth is there’s a bottom threshold in office dress but there is not really an upper threshold (outside of formal wear). T-shirts and shorts are frowned upon in the workplace but rarely is a tie and sport coat. Do not be afraid to challenge the culture of your workplace by wearing a tie. You will create a new culture and people will either rise to meet it or you will stand out proudly.

I hope that reading this article will inspire you to wear a tie and maybe a jacket to work. Ties are a seemingly small piece of fabric in a man’s wardrobe but they can carry immense importance in a modern setting. A strip of silk hanging from the neck will naturally set the wearer apart from those around him. Handled astutely, this separation can lead to some surprising benefits. 

_________________________________

Mark Richardson is a graduate of Texas A&M University, a civil engineer by trade, and a history lover in heart. His passion for presenting his personal best through proper attire was nurtured in the southern tradition in which he was raised. Mark and his wife, Victoria, reside in Katy, Texas.

The post Here’s What Happened When I Wore a Tie to Work Every Day for a Year appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

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<![CDATA[How to Eat What You Want and Still Lose Weight]]>

It’s a new year, and for a lot of people, losing weight is their primary resolution. Yet they’ve probably made this goal before, and failed before. This time they really, really want to make it happen.

One barrier these folks will often feel in even getting started, however, is choosing the right diet to follow. Should they go keto? Do intermittent fasting? Do the Zone diet or the raw food diet?

Folks can find success with any number of diet plans if these plans fit their personality and lifestyle, and can be sustained indefinitely (you do not want to yo-yo diet). 

But today I’m going to share with you the diet plan I recommend most. I think it’s one of the most sustainable and effective, and can in fact be used in conjunction with other kinds of diets.

It’s the system I’ve personally used for the past four years to lose (and sometimes gain) weight, pack on muscle, trim inches off my waist, and get stronger. 

It’s really not a diet at all — at least not in the traditional way people throw that word around: I don’t limit the types of foods I can eat nor do I massively restrict calories. I get to eat pretty much anything I want, including Little Debbie brownies, pizza, and Chick-fil-A spicy chicken sandwiches.

This “diet” is called tracking your macros. And today I’ll walk you through how to make it a simple but transformative part of your life.

What Is Macro Tracking?

“Macros” is short for “macronutrients,” which are the primary components of food: protein, carbohydrates, and fats. 

When you track your macros you aim to consume a predetermined amount of protein, carbs, and fat each day. It doesn’t matter what you eat (within reason) to hit those goals. As long as you stay within your macro goals for the day, you’re good. 

Tracking your macros as a nutrition system is often called “If It Fits Your Macros” (IIFYM for short) because, well, you can pretty much eat anything as long as it fits your macros; there are no foods or food groups that are off limits. For this reason, it’s also called “flexible dieting.”

Macro tracking is flexible in a couple other ways as well.

First, it can be used to gain weight and maintain weight, and not just lose weight. 

Second, you can use it in conjunction with other kinds of diets.

Do you like to intermittent fast? Well, you can incorporate macro tracking into that to ensure you get enough of the nutrients you need during your eating window. 

Are you doing low carb? You can track macros for that to know if you’re actually eating low carb and if you’re getting enough calories to support your energy needs. 

Whatever your health or fitness goals are, macro tracking has got you covered.

Why Track Macros Instead of Counting Calories?

All diets essentially work by putting you into a caloric deficit, so why not just count your calories instead of tracking your macros?

When you track the number of grams you consume of each macronutrient, you do indirectly count your calories as well. Each gram of macronutrients corresponds to a certain number of calories:

  • 1 g of protein=4 calories
  • 1 g of carbohydrates=4 calories
  • 1 g of fat=9 calories

When you set targets/limits on your macro goals, you also set targets/limits on your calories. Macro tracking has an advantage over pure calorie counting, however, in that it helps ensure you get enough protein in your diet — which builds muscle and improves athletic performance. It also allows you to manipulate the proportion of fat and carbs you use for your energy sources. Through experimentation, you can find if your body runs best with fewer carbs and more fat, or vice versa.

My Experience With Macro Tracking

Macro tracking has been a game-changer for me. I’ve tried a few fad diets in the past, including the low-carb variety like Paleo and Atkins. I was able to lose weight on these low-carb diets, but my performance in the gym suffered due to the lack of carbs. And instead of looking healthy and strong, I’d look deflated. That’s just me, though. Other folks may have success with low-carb diets (especially if they’re just focused on losing weight rather than athletic performance). 

Another problem with other diets was compliance. I’d stick to the diet pretty religiously for a few weeks, but eventually my willpower depleted and I’d find myself gorging on lots of food I “shouldn’t” have been eating. I’d then get back on the wagon, only for the cycle to begin again.

Once I discovered macro tracking, I was able to manipulate my nutrition depending on my fitness goals. If my goal is to get big and strong, well, I just set my macro intake higher, particularly my carb intake. If I need to shed some body fat, then I reduce my macros and consume more fat than carbohydrates. 

But the biggest benefit of flexible dieting is that it gives me back autonomy over what I eat. There’s no list of forbidden foods. I don’t have to endure the daily battle of living in the most varied, interesting food landscape in history, while only being able to eat from a list a dozen items long. I’ve never felt deprived or guilty about what I eat since I started tracking macros. I eat the foods that I enjoy as long as it fits within my macro goals for that day. 

The sense of autonomy that flexible dieting provides is a big reason I’ve been able to sustain this way of eating for four years straight. Research shows that in order for health behaviors (like healthy eating) to be sustainable, the behaviors have to be freely chosen. As soon as you feel like you’re being told what to do or what you should eat, you’ve already sewn the seeds of failure.

How to Track Your Macros to Lose (or Gain) Weight

How to Figure Out What Your Macro Goals Should Be

The first step in tracking your macros is figuring out what your daily macro goals should be. 

This will vary depending on your current weight, your activity level, health issues (e.g., if you’re diabetic you may need to eat fewer carbs), and what your fitness goals are. Ideally, you’d work with a certified dietician who would help you establish what your daily macro intake should be. 

If you’re not in a position where you can consult a dietician, you can use a macro calculator online. Most are free, but may require you to sign up for their site. The best free macro calculator that I’ve come across is https://www.iifym.com/. (You do have to sign up with their site to get your results.) You answer a few questions about your weight, activity level, and goals, and they provide your macro breakdown. 

Based on my experience tracking macros, here are rough guidelines you can use to calculate your macro intake based on whether you want to lose weight or gain weight. These calculations assume that you’re working out three times a week and can eat a relatively high carb diet. 

Losing Weight

  • Protein: 1 g x your bodyweight in pounds
  • Carbs: 1 g x your bodyweight in pounds
  • Fat: .27 g x your bodyweight in pounds

So using these numbers, if you weigh 240 lbs and you’re trying to lose weight, your macro intake would look like this:

  • Protein: 240 grams
  • Carbs: 240 grams
  • Fat: 65 grams
  • Total calories: 2505

If you wanted to eat fewer carbs than fat, you could switch things up by eating 100 grams of carbs and 127 grams of fat a day. Keep the protein the same. This breakdown would still give you 2,505 calories which will likely put you in a caloric deficit, meaning you’ll lose weight. 

If you’re losing about 1 pound a week, you’re good. If not, you’ll need to make some adjustments (more on that below). 

Gaining Weight

  • Protein: 1 g x your bodyweight in pounds
  • Carbs: 2 g x your bodyweight in pounds
  • Fat: .75 g x your bodyweight in pounds

So using these numbers, if you weigh 155 lbs and you’re trying to gain weight, your daily macro intake would look like this: 

  • Protein: 155 grams
  • Carbs: 310 grams
  • Fat: 116 grams
  • Total calories: 2,904

Again, you can modify this based on whether you want to do high carb or low carb. Just keep your protein the same and modify your fats and carbs so that you still hit near that 2,904 total calorie intake. 

You know your macro intake for gaining weight is working if you’re gaining about a pound a week. If you’re not, you’ll need to adjust (more on that below).

Make sure to read our in-depth article on how to gain weight

How to Track Your Macros

So you’ve established your macro goals. Now how do you know the macro breakdown of the food you’re eating and how do you keep track of the macros you consume throughout the day?

Enter MyFitnessPal

This app makes tracking your macros super easy. They have over 11 million foods (including foods at most major restaurants) in their database with the calorie count and macro breakdown. Just search for it, enter your serving size, and bam! Macros tracked. You can even scan the barcode of packaged foods with your smartphone and the macro information will be entered automatically. 

The basic service is free and allows you to track macros and set goals. If you’re just getting started with macro tracking, this is all you need. 

Once you’ve been at it for a bit, I’d recommend upgrading to the premium plan. It costs $50 a year, but it gives you some nice features like being able to have different macro goals for different days and the ability to change your macro goals by percentages. These features aren’t necessary to track macros, but they’re nice to have as you get more advanced with IIFYM. 

You can track your macros on the MyFitnessPal website or you can download the app for your smartphone. The app is a lot easier to use than the website. 

How Do I Know How Much I’ve Eaten?

One of the biggest challenges for tracking macros is figuring out portions. To accurately calculate your macro intake, you need to know how much food you’re eating. 

Food that comes in a standardized, pre-portioned form is easy. For example, if you eat a packaged protein bar, just look it up on MyFitnessPal and enter it in your log. Macros calculated. Same thing with standardized restaurant food, like a Big Mac.

When you’re eating something where the portion size varies, and you’re in control of it, things get a little trickier. If you want to be accurate about how much oatmeal you’re eating, or how big the chicken breast is you’re consuming, you need to measure with measuring cups and/or weigh your food on a scale.

This part of macro tracking admittedly made me feel like a weirdo at first. I never thought I’d be the dude weighing my cereal. But here I am. After awhile, it just becomes second nature. 

When I’m at home, I measure most of the food I’m eating. For example, every morning I have one whole egg and 8 ounces of egg whites (portioned in a measuring cup) with one ounce of shredded cheese (weighed on a scale). 

For my mid-morning meal, it’s 82 grams of Cinnamon Toast Crunch (weighed on a scale) with a whey protein shake consisting of two scoops of whey (here’s the type of whey I recommend) and two tablespoons of olive oil (sounds gross but I don’t mind it). 

This kind of measuring isn’t too difficult when you’re just combining a couple foods (e.g., eggs + cheese), and you’re eating at home. But what do you do when you’re eating a more complex combo of foods (e.g., beef stroganoff or chicken lo mein), and/or you’re in a situation (e.g., a restaurant or Grandma’s Thanksgiving dinner) where bringing a scale and weighing your food would be weird and socially awkward?

When it comes to complex dishes, and you’re eating at home, you can enter each ingredient for the recipe into MyFitnessPal (and create a single food item for that recipe to bring up in the future). But that’s pretty tedious. Rather than entering each ingredient for beef stroganoff into the app, I just search for “beef stroganoff” and use one of the existing entries already in the database. Is it totally accurate? No. People will use more cream or oil or meat or whatever in individual recipes. But you don’t have to be exact with tracking macros for it to work. As long as you have a rough idea of how much you’re eating, you’re good. Don’t sweat the details. 

I measure out most of my meals during the day except for dinner. There I just eyeball it and dish out a judicious amount of food so I can eat with my family without having to measure my food on a scale. 

The same thing goes for eating out or eating at someone else’s house when the exact proportion of ingredients in a dish isn’t clear and the nutrition information isn’t standardized. Just eyeball it and use your judgment. After measuring your food at home long enough, you get a rough idea of what a cup of food or 5 ounces of meat looks like. You can also figure out portion size by using your hand as a rough guide.

Most of the time you’re going to be eating at home/eating meals you’ve prepared yourself and can control. When you’re not, again, don’t unduly sweat the details.

Can You Really Eat Anything As Long As It Fits Your Macros?

In theory, yes, but we all know some foods are better for you than others. 

Yes, you can eat that bowl of Cinnamon Toast Crunch if you want to, but make sure you get some carbs from sources like oats, veggies, and fruits too. They have important micronutrients and fiber your body needs. You can hit your fat macros with a cheeseburger, but olive oil, avocado, and nuts are healthier sources of such.

Eat a varied diet. Treat yourself to foods you really enjoy throughout the day but get the bulk of your calories from whole, natural, fiber-rich foods. 

As you stick with macro tracking, you’ll find that refined, sugary, fatty, calorically dense foods don’t satiate your hunger as well, making it harder to stick with your macro goals. If you pay attention to this feedback, you’ll naturally start choosing more lower-calorie, higher volume foods that better fill you up. 

Adjusting Your Macros Each Week

Once a week you’ll want to weigh yourself and measure around your waist. (I use Myotape to do this.) I do my measurements every Friday morning; I usually eat a little more on the weekend, so I wait for the resulting bloating to dissipate before I do my weight/measurement check-in.

Adjusting Macros to Lose Weight

If your goal is to lose weight and you’re losing pounds and inches, you can stick with your current macro intake. 

If you’ve stalled out, it’s probably time for an adjustment. Don’t make any drastic changes! Just reduce your calories by 100. Take the calories from your carbs and fats. Leave your protein alone. For example, you could reduce your carbs by 25 grams to reduce your calories by 100. 

Stick to this new reduced macro goal for another week. If you’re losing weight and inches, stick to that macro intake. If you stall again, reduce by another 100 calories. 

To avoid yo-yo dieting, you should approach weight loss slowly and steadily: Aim to lose a pound of weight and ¼ of an inch off your waist each week. This rate may not be dramatic, but it is sustainable

Adjusting Macros to Gain Weight

Adjusting your macros to gain weight is the same as for losing weight. If you’re gaining weight with your current macro intake, stick with it. 

If you stall out, add 100 calories. Keep your protein the same and add your calories with carbs and/or fat.

Stick to the new increased macro intake for another week. If you’re gaining weight, stick with it. If you stall, add another 100 calories. 

Adjusting Macros for Training

Besides adjusting your macros for weight loss and weight gain, if you’re serious about your physical training, you’ll also want to consider adjusting your macros to improve performance. 

Pay attention to what your body feels like during training. If you’re feeling lethargic and weak, you might not be consuming enough carbohydrates; dial down your fat and dial up your carbs. Or you might not be getting enough food in general: bump your calories up by 100 a day to see what happens. 

If you’re strength training, don’t worry about gaining a little weight when you bump up your calories; contrary to popular belief, you can’t be strong and ripped at the same time. Once the weight you’re lifting in the gym increases, you can enter a cutting phase where you reduce your fat/carb macros, and shed the body weight you put on.

Macro Tracking for Eating Out and Big Meals

One of the things I love about macro tracking is that it allows me to splurge at restaurants while staying on target with my fitness goals.

For example, if I know that I’ll be having Chick-fil-A for dinner, I put what I plan to eat there that evening into MyFitnessPal in the morning. I can then see how much carbs and fats I have left for the rest of the day. 

On holidays, I don’t track anything except for protein. I try to get in most of my protein intake before the big meal so I feel satiated and I ensure I get the muscle-building nutrients I need to recover from training. Then I just eat whatever — sweet potatoes, stuffing, rolls, pies. The carby, fatty stuff. I don’t measure it, but I listen to my body. If I’m feeling full, I stop eating. 

Macro tracking is a habit that takes some time to adjust to, but it’s a very simple system that’s incredibly sustainable in the long run. After a while, it will just become part of your lifestyle — a lifestyle you’ll truly enjoy when you can eat whatever you want, while still losing weight and staying strong and fit. 

The post How to Eat What You Want and Still Lose Weight appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

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<![CDATA[16 Ways to Become a Better Man in the New Year]]>

When it comes to New Year’s goals and resolutions, not all are created equal. Below we suggest 16 that offer a whole lot of ROI. Some take only a few minutes; others represent simple changes; all will positively transform your life and help you become a better man.

While it’s very doable to do all 16 this year, if you’re daunted, just pick a few to concentrate on. Heck, just commit to accomplishing one; if you adopt a single new practice each year, in a decade your life will be ten positive habits richer.

1. Get a Real Alarm Clock 

The first thing you do in the morning and the last thing you do at night serve as the bookends of your day, setting a limit on what they’ll be able to “hold,” and sending a potent signal to yourself as to what you think is most important. If the first and final thing you do every day is look at your phone, you’re creating a shallow, distracted foundation for what lies in between. So keep your phone out of your room at night, use a regular “old school” alarm clock to wake up in the morning, and don’t touch your phone when you rise until after you’ve done something (prayer, meditation, push-ups) that represents the man you’re going to be that day.

2. Read One Book Every Week

The average book takes about five to seven hours to read. That means if you read just one hour a day or less, you can read one book every single week of the year. Everyone’s got an hour a day to repurpose for reading: cut out one hour of Netflix at night; read a half hour at lunch and a half hour in the evening; read during your subway commute; read in the small snatches of spare moments that arise throughout your day. (You can find our best tips for reading more in general here.) Can you imagine how much better of a man you’ll be at the end of the year when you’ve read 52 books?

3. Drink Nothing But Water

What a colossal waste of calories caloric beverages are. They simply don’t taste that great (especially if we’re talking about soda), and have little to no nutritional value. If you want a treat, at least consume something you can chew! Drinking nothing but water is the very easiest way to lose weight; people can often drop significant poundage and improve their all-around health profile just by making this move. You could tackle this goal while still drinking diet soda and making occasional allowances for alcohol, but you’d be better off cutting out those too in favor of pure H2O.

4. Start a Strength Training Program

No matter if you’re currently sedentary, or do cardio, and nothing but cardio, you could benefit from adding resistance training to your life. Strength training improves your overall health, helps you lose weight, boosts your testosterone, and makes you feel more virile in general. Not sure where to start? Begin with a simple novice linear progression program or sign up for online coaching with a program like Barbell Logic (which is what I personally use and have had major success with).

5. Call Your Mom Once a Week

You know she’s dying to hear from you.

6. Give At Least One Compliment Every Day

People want to be noticed and needed; they crave affirmation and recognition almost as keenly as food and water. And you can fill this human need in less time than it takes to make Cup O’ Noodles. Train yourself to be more observant of how others excel in ways big and small, and call out these accomplishments in behavior, performance, talent, style, and character. Don’t forget to regularly compliment your own family too — who we ironically are the most likely to take for granted!

7. Host a Dinner Party Once a Quarter

According to the authors of Brunch Is Hell, dinner parties can serve as the very cornerstone of a healthy modern society. Why? Because they promote life-giving relationships and civil conversation. Throwing a dinner party offers numerous benefits to the individual host as well, including offering the chance to practice your cooking and social skills, adding the tang of anticipation to your life, and simply motivating you to finally clean up your house! So aim to throw one dinner party ever quarter this year; it’s both easier and more edifying than you think. 

8. Take a Short Walk Every Day

There’s a reason philosophers from Aristotle to Nietzsche were committed walkers: taking a stroll clears the mind, helps you solve problems, and generates insights. According to explorer Erling Kagge, walking also slows down time and makes your life feel more memorable. And of course moving your body is good for your health. So take a short saunter every day, in every kind of weather.

9. Journal

Journaling is a way to cognitively and emotionally process all the stuff you’re going through. Writing requires you to think logically and linearly, which makes it particularly helpful for putting things like depression and anger into perspective. There’s no right way to journal though: Write about what happened that day; write about what you’re grateful for. Write spontaneously; write based off predetermined prompts (we’ve got two sets of these available here and here). Write a paragraph; write a single sentence.

10. Plan Your Weekends

We often think of planning only in terms of one’s workaday life (the scheduling of which can indeed be beneficial), whereas we feel that leisure time should be wholly spontaneous. But everyone’s life experience shows that good times typically don’t just happen; when left to chance, we end up surrendering our free time to inertia and don’t end up doing much at all. So take a page from Ernest Hemingway and intentionally plan out your weekends, always having an idea of a few fun things you’d like to do as you head into them. (If you’re married, we highly recommend doing this planning during your weekly marriage meeting.) You’ll have an easier time facing Monday, when you truly made the most of your Saturday/Sunday.

11. Turn Off Notifications on Your Phone

If you’re sick of being distracted by your phone, but haven’t yet turned off its notifications, then you haven’t begun to fight. As Indistractable author Nir Eyal told me in our podcast interview: “Two-thirds of people with a smartphone never change their notification settings. That’s ridiculous. Can we really complain about technology addicting us if we haven’t taken 10 minutes to change the notifications settings?”

12. Fast for 24 Hours Once a Month

Fasting does great things for one’s health, including normalizing insulin levels, promoting the secretion of human growth hormone, and spurring cell regeneration. It’s also a powerful way to train the soul, so that the spirit becomes stronger than the flesh. Research shows that fasting even once a month produces the aforementioned physical benefits, and anecdotal evidence suggests that a monthly fast is sufficient to incur robust spiritual benefits as well.

13. Exercise and/or Commute One Day a Week Without Music/Podcasts

It’s only in silence and solitude that we hear life’s most important “sounds” — our internal voice, creative inspiration, promptings towards a calling, solutions to dilemmas, things we need to do for or say to others. Yet we are usually so surrounded by noise that these critical messages never get through. To home in on these signals, carve out some weekly quiet time by exercising or commuting without music, podcasts, or any other human-created static. 

14. Floss. For Real This Time.

Stave off gum disease. Make your dentist proud.

15. Start a New Hobby

In seeking to get control of our lives, we often try to cut out device-born distractions. This is good, but as digital minimalist Cal Newport points out, if you want to avoid being pulled back by their siren song, you can’t just empty your life of time-wasters — you have to fill it with worthy pursuits. That’s where hobbies come in; find an activity that’s just as compelling, and way more satisfying, than twiddling on your phone. Not sure which hobby to try your hand at? We have a list of 75 of them here.

16. Attend Church Each Week

Even if your beliefs are uncertain and your faith isn’t firm, attending a religious service each week can greatly improve your life and relationships in numerous ways; even if you’re not sure you believe in an immortal soul, church attendance can be good for it. It offers one of the easiest ways to make friends, an opportunity for reflection, and a discipline-building ritual. It improves mental and physical health and furnishes opportunities to do service. At the very least, it provides an all-too-rare chance to engage in some group singing.

The post 16 Ways to Become a Better Man in the New Year appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

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<![CDATA[19 Instagram Marketing Strategies that Work]]> Everyone has Instagram. Dogs and babies have Instagram. Even babies who haven’t been born yet are racking up followers. If you’re feeling behind, know this: making a splash with Instagram marketing has been done over and over, which means you can do it, too. Certain tactics work in a pretty foolproof way.

Ninety percent of Instagram accounts follow a business. If you get Instagram marketing right, it can be worth the money and time you invest in the platform. You have to continually create content that grabs your audience’s attention, grow your following and increase your engagement rate. In this post we’ll show you nineteen strategies for doing just that.

Setting Goals for Your Instagram Marketing

It’s okay to have more than one goal, as long as all of your goals are defined and you keep them in mind when creating content. Brands use Instagram marketing to:

  • Collect new leads
  • Connect with their audience
  • Get established as an industry leader
  • Humanize their company
  • Increase brand awareness
  • Inspire future customers or fans
  • Promote the items or services they sell
  • Recruit employees or influencers

You won’t use the following tips all at once. Choose two or three and make them work for you before adopting more.

19 Instagram Marketing Strategies that Work

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1. Optimize Your Instagram Profile

There are a few must-dos when creating an Instagram account and profile:

  • Use your business name as your full name and username. If that’s not possible, at least use the most recognizable part of your business name.
  • Use your logo as the profile picture. Remember that it’s going to be cropped into a circle.
  • In the bio, summarize how your business helps people. Include a CTA, like a branded hashtag or a reason to visit the clickable URL.
  • Add a URL that directs to a product or landing page you’re currently promoting.
  • Switch to a business account, which comes with more in-depth insights.

2. Stick to Your Brand Aesthetic

Instagram is a visual platform, and your imagery should create a consistent brand. You’ll show your audience what to expect while increasing brand recognition. Consider using presets or filters to get the same look on all of your content. You can photograph whatever you want and adapt it to your brand during the editing stage.

Knowing where to place images in relation to each other will make your profile balanced. Intersperse simple, minimalist posts between busier ones. Branding goes beyond visuals, too. The captions you use in your images should be on-brand as well. The accounts you follow and engage with are also part of your branding, so choose wisely.

3. Consider Your Audience

If you already have an established brand, you’ve likely defined your audience. From there, think about your how your audience specifically relates to Instagram marketing:

  • Are they part of any Instagram communities?
  • What type of content do they engage with on Instagram?
  • Which hashtags are they using most often?

It can be hard to sniff out your audience. Pay attention to users who tag you, watch your Stories, follow you or comment on your content. Also, go to a competitor’s profile and see who’s engaging with them.

4. Be as Authentic as Possible

Even accounts that push products should have lifestyle-esque posts. Authentic content humanizes your brand, connects with your audience and shows how reliable your business is. Connect with a customer who’s had a great experience. Maybe they tagged you in an Instagram post or sent you an email about how much they like a product. Reach out to them to hear more. Ask them to tell you their story and provide a photo. Instagram Stories lend themselves particularly well to authentic content. While your regular Instagram feed should be polished, Stories content can be off-the-cuff.

Instagram marketing

5. Take Time to Write Intriguing Captions

Users see the first three lines of a caption before they have to click “more…” to read the rest. Put important information above the fold. Long captions are still okay, though – Instagram is part-storytelling platform. Include a CTA in each caption. Have users fill-in-the-blank, offer feedback about a specific product or answer a question.

If you’re someplace notable, add a geotag, too. They appear at the top of the post, under your username. Stick with three or four hashtags per post, combining basic hashtags with niche ones. To get ideas, search for a word or phrase, then click “Tags” to see related hashtags.

Instagram marketing

Create an original, branded hashtag when you have a campaign or event to promote. Or, create a hashtag for users to use when posting their photos and videos. Influencer Andi Dorfman uses #andorfins to build a running-themed community:

Instagram marketing

Instagram marketing

6. Understand the Different Types of Instagram Marketing Posts

Aside from regular photo posts on the main feed, there are a few different ways to share content:

Carousel Posts for Instagram Marketing

Posting several times in a row would annoy your audience. Carousel posts let you combine a series of photos and/or videos. Show moments from an event, present a product in a number of ways or compare before-and-after shots. Consider leading with a promotional video, then following with photos to add context.

Instagram Stories for Instagram Marketing

Instagram Stories are excellent for creating interactive or time-sensitive content. While you can plan out Stories just as much as you do your regular feed, it’s also fine to use organic content there. You can do a lot with Stories:

  • Add a geotag, hashtag or user tag
  • Create an emoji slider, poll or question
  • Include a clickable link
  • Lay a filter over your photo
  • Write or draw on an image

Stories disappear after 24 hours, but with Highlights, they can live forever. Your Highlights section serves as a menu where you can post Stories that are important to your audience. Think of them as an extension of your Instagram bio.

Instagram marketing

Videos for Instagram Marketing

Short videos can be added to your Instagram feed and Stories. By default, they’ll play without sound, so make sure they’re understandable even when muted. If viewers need to listen, say so in the caption. Here are four more creative ways to use video for Instagram marketing:

  • Boomerang: Stich together a burst of photos and make a short, repetitive video, kind of like a GIF. For example, clink glasses with a coworker at a party.
  • Hyperlapse: Condense a lengthy video into a short, smooth, time-lapse video.
  • Instagram TV: IGTV is for longer videos, like cooking tutorials, interviews or product reviews. Videos can be up to 10 minutes long or up to one hour if you have a verified account.
  • Live Video: When you go live, online users will get a notification to tune in. Use live video when something is happening that you need to share right away. There’s also a built-in chat feature, so you can hold an impromptu Q&A session.

7. Show the Culture of Your Workplace

Behind-the-scenes and day-in-the-life posts remind your audience that you’re a people-powered brand. Show your office space or zoom in on employees’ desks. Demonstrate how you set up your storefront or store window. Unveil your manufacturing process. Repost content from your team’s own accounts or have an employee take over the business account for a day.

Culture content shows an assortment of people, places, events and points of view, keeping your feed fresh. Bonus points if your team is giving back in some way – today’s consumers want their brand to be charitable. Avoid the “boring group photo,” though. This has become a cliché, and a far-off shot of a group of 30 people posing at a retreat tells your audience nothing. Something like this tells more of a story:

Instagram marketing

8. Run a Contest or Draw Attention to a Promotion

Contests come with a prize, which customers love, but there’s even more value in it for you. To enter, require that users follow your account or post to their own feed with your branded hashtag. Just don’t make them jump through too many hoops – if a lot of steps are involved, they won’t bother. Also promote discounts, buy-one-get-one deals and other types of offerings. Provide a coupon code and directions for claiming the offer. Change your bio URL to whatever is most relevant for the promotion.

9. Tease a Launch, Then Go Live

Carousel ads and Stories build anticipation and tease a product launch or sale. Adding several photos and videos at once means that users can flip through them and get excited for what’s next. You can also add a countdown to a Story, which your followers can subscribe to. When time’s up, they’ll get a notification. When it’s time for your announcement, go live to increase urgency.

10. Team Up with Influencers

Influencer marketing introduces your brand to a new, broader audience. The influencer will create the content and post it to their account. You can provide them with guidelines so that the post is on-brand for you without being off-brand for them.

Instagram marketing

You can also have the influencer take over your Instagram marketing for the day. They’ll promote the takeover on their own account, too. If you don’t want the content permanently on your main feed, share it just to Stories and then add it to Highlights.

If you’re working with a minimal budget, start with micro-influencers. They have small, highly engaged followings, and when their audience is in your niche, it’s an excellent growth technique. However you approach influencer marketing, always be upfront with your audience if the relationship or a post is paid for. Also, never require that the influencer give your brand a positive review.

11. Be Savvy About Inspirational Content

We all love a dose of #inspo now and then, but motivational quotes without a purpose won’t help your brand. Create your own inspirational posts that are on-brand and relevant, like Refinery29 does. The message here is simple, but Refinery29 is mainly about inspiring women, so it works:

Instagram marketing

Even if you have a lot of wisdom to offer, sprinkle in inspirational quotes sparingly. Too many can make your feed look frivolous. And if a quote is too corny, turn the sentiment into a story.

12. Take Advantage of Trends and Holidays

Newsjacking is when you capitalize on what’s newsworthy to attract attention to your brand. That may be a large societal issue or hot button topic. It may also be #NationalLazyDay (August 10th, in case you’re wondering). There’s a social media holiday for practically everything, and you can find plenty of them to suit your brand.

13. Set Up Shoppable Posts

Unfortunately, regular Instagram posts don’t let you add a clickable link to the description. For brands that sell products, shoppable posts are the solution. When you tag your products in a post, users can tap to find out more and make a purchase.

When it comes to creating product posts, get creative. There are a ton of brands selling products on Instagram, so your content has to be eye-catching and interesting. See how your audience is using your products – portable items, like books or travel gear, end up in cool locations.

14. Give Away Knowledge for Free

You’ll never run out of expert-level knowledge, so don’t be afraid of giving it away to your audience for free. People love tutorials, especially if they can learn everything within Instagram. Include all the information in the post instead of making the user click to another app or site. Fashion brands can show how to style a piece of clothing. SaaS companies can demonstrate how to use a main feature. Restaurants can share recipes so customers can replicate favorite meals at home.

Instagram marketing

15. Tap Into Your Users for Instagram Marketing Content

When you don’t have time to create your own content, turn to your customers. Sharing user-generated content (UGC) is effortless, and you can use an app that’s specifically designed to let you share Instagram posts. Not only can you pad your feed, but your customers will see how others use your products or services.

Always credit the original creator by tagging them in the photo as well as in the caption. You should always ask permission before you repost UGC. However, creating a branded hashtag for the purpose of sharing UGC can make the process easier because users hope for it to be shared.

16. Know the Best Times to Post to Maximize Instagram Marketing

Instagram’s algorithm shows posts to people who have shown interest in similar posts in the past. Make sure your audience is seeing and interacting with your posts so they can see and interact with future posts. Post when you know they’re online. Until you’re regularly churning out content and can conduct your own research, we have a guide to the best time to post on Instagram.

Your ideal posting schedule is most important for the regular Instagram feed. Stories have a 24-hour lifespan, so users know to check out Stories as they appear at the top of the app. Unless you need immediate engagement or are going live, timing is less important with Stories.

17. Post More Than Once a Day

A lot of Instagram users check out the app once a day, and many are on more often. Plus, when you consider different time zones, you’re never going to catch everyone’s attention with just one post a day. Your first option is to post to your regular feed at least twice a day. However, you may not want to overwhelm the look or vibe of your feed with so much content. Or, you may be afraid of annoying your biggest fans who are seeing everything you post. This is where Stories become super helpful.

18. Remember That Engagement is a Two-Way Street

In order to encourage engagement, you have to be a participant on Instagram, too. It’s a given of Instagram marketing that you should respond to comments on your feed. Additionally, follow popular accounts in your industry and comment on their posts. Also, when a user tags you in a post, check it out, write a comment and consider sharing it to your account.

19. Track Your Performance and Tweak Your Instagram Marketing Strategy

The Instagram marketing metrics that are most important to you will be based on your specific goals. However, followers and engagement are important no matter what, and you want to see those numbers steadily increasing.

Stories is especially useful for tracking performance. You can see how many people looked at each Story. If you find that half your viewers dropped off midway, look closely at the last-viewed Story to determine where you went wrong. Also, if you’re not getting as many views on your Stories as you want, tease them in your regular feed, like Gold’s Gym did:

Instagram marketing

Final Thoughts About Instagram Marketing

Every time you post to Instagram, you need eye-catching imagery, an interesting caption and relevant hashtags. Posting regularly and frequently requires resources: creative thinking, photo gear, time to set up shots, people who can handle posting and writing descriptions, managing feedback from your followers, etc. There’s no one-size-fits-all Instagram marketing plan. Stay on-brand and create a cohesive feed while experimenting with different types of content until you find the ones that work.

Some of the best, most up-to-the-minute social media and Instagram marketing advice comes from podcasts and interviews with experts. Check out my list of the 14 Best Podcasts for Social Media Marketers.

Featured Image via Brilliantist Studio / shutterstock.com

The post 19 Instagram Marketing Strategies that Work appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

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https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/marketing/instagram-marketing-strategies 2395925@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Sun, 29 Dec 2019 12:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[How to Create the Best LinkedIn Homepage for Your Account]]> If you’ve had to look for a job within the last few years, you probably don’t need an introduction to LinkedIn. It’s the biggest online professional network in the world, with hundreds of millions of users. However, to get the most out of it, you’ll need to know how to optimize your LinkedIn homepage.

This feature enables you to find new networking opportunities, read content related to your field, and publish articles of your own. In this post, we’ll show you how to improve your LinkedIn homepage so you see the latest, most relevant updates in your industry.

Let’s get to it!

Why You Should Consider Being Active on LinkedIn

Most people change jobs an average of 12 times during their careers. Some of those switches might be moves away from entry-level roles that don’t require much experience, but the bulk of them involve professionals taking new positions in their fields.

Unlike your grandparents, you’re not likely to stick with the same company for all of your working life. It’s not a matter of loyalty. The fact is, changing jobs is the best way to obtain a significant increase in wages. If you want access to a better, more comfortable lifestyle, being willing to leave your current position may be necessary.

However, that means you have to be aggressive about job hunting, which involves:

  • Networking within your field
  • Staying on the radar of people in charge of hiring
  • Keeping an eye out for job opportunities

Advancement used to be all about who you knew in real life. Now, platforms such as LinkedIn play a massive role in the job-hunting process for both potential employees and hiring managers.

To give you an idea of how powerful a tool LinkedIn can be, consider the fact that 50 percent of all college graduates in the United States use the platform. That’s a massive professional network to connect with, and all you have to do is know how to pull the right levers to make sure you’re seeing the most relevant content when you log in.

How to Create the Best LinkedIn Homepage for Your Account (4 Key Strategies)

When it comes to LinkedIn, most people focus on their profiles. That’s a smart move, since it can help show off your qualifications. However, in many cases, it’s your homepage that will introduce you to the most exciting networking opportunities. Here’s how to get the most out of yours.

1. Follow People, Companies, and Topics to Feed Relevant Content to Your LinkedIn Homepage

LinkedIn homepages function similarly to other social media feeds. As soon as you log in, you can see popular posts from other users, updates from companies and people you follow, and more:

An example of a LinkedIn homepage.

One key difference between LinkedIn and other platforms is that you’ll also see job recommendations. An algorithm that considers location, experience, and your specified industry curates suggestions drawn from openings listed by businesses:

Recommended jobs from a LinkedIn homepage.

If you haven’t taken the time to thoroughly fill out your profile and specify your interests, your LinkedIn homepage may not contain information you find all that relevant. You can fix this by tailoring the list of people, companies, and topics you follow.

To get started, click on the Followed Hashtags link under your profile widget on the left side of your homepage:

The Followed Hashtags option in LinkedIn.

Then, click on the Follow fresh perspectives button:

The Follow Fresh Perspectives button in LinkedIn.

On the next page, you’ll see a collection of businesses, hashtags, and users that LinkedIn thinks will be relevant to you:

Relevant people, companies, and topics to follow in LinkedIn.

You can click on the + Follow button below any of these suggestions to start seeing updates from the correlating party on your homepage. The more accounts and topics you follow, the better LinkedIn’s recommendations should become as it learns your interests.

You’ll likely need to follow at least ten accounts to give LinkedIn enough information to start making quality suggestions. A smart place to start is by following your current employer and coworkers, as well as companies you may be interested in working with and hashtags that are relevant to your field.

2. Expand Your LinkedIn Network So Your Homepage Displays Content From Your Connections

Another way to tell LinkedIn what you’re interested in seeing on your homepage is by connecting with other users you may know personally. It’s important to note that this process is different from following someone as we described in the previous tip.

When you follow someone on LinkedIn, it simply means you’ll see their posts and updates on your homepage. A connection, on the other hand, is a two-way endorsement. It means you’re vouching for someone’s skills as a professional.

As a rule of thumb, you connect with users you know but follow persons of interest in your field who you haven’t met. You can start building your network by clicking on the My Network icon in the top bar menu, or searching for people by name:

The LinkedIn My Network icon and search bar.

You’ll then see a list of potential connections based on your location, field, place of work, and other factors:

Making LinkedIn connections.

Simply click on the Connect button to send an invitation to another user. By default, you and each of your connections will follow each other, too, so you’ll see their posts on your homepage. Building your network out also helps LinkedIn make more relevant suggestions down the line.

3. Interact With Publications and Persons of Interest on Your LinkedIn Homepage

Just through following other users and making connections alone, your homepage should start to fill up with relevant posts and updates. This will help you find new job opportunities and stay up-to-date with industry happenings.

However, showing potential employers that you’re active and invested in your field may encourage them to reach out to you and invite you to apply for openings. One way to do this is by interacting with LinkedIn content, including:

  • Liking or sharing articles you find interesting
  • Adding valuable comments that share your unique insights
  • Directly replying to other users’ comments

It’s especially wise to engage with content from persons of interest who you think may open up job opportunities down the road. This may include hiring managers or people who work in leadership positions in companies you follow.

Just as with any social network, there’s a lot of ‘noise’ within LinkedIn comments sections. Rather than contributing to it with one-word replies, focus on writing comments that can spark discussions. You may even be able to create a meaningful conversation with someone that puts you on their radar:

Valuable comments on a LinkedIn article.

It may sound a little too calculating, but think about it this way. You probably already spend a lot of time interacting with content on social media. What you’re doing here is precisely the same, only it may pay off in the long run, unlike posting cat memes on Facebook.

4. Publish Content Tailored to Your Desired Audience So Others See Your Work

By far the best way to take advantage of your LinkedIn homepage is to publish your own original content. Just like on other social networks, you can share basic status updates with your connections. For example, you may want to let people know when you’re looking for new job opportunities:

Open job opportunities in LinkedIn.
However, LinkedIn also enables you to publish full-length articles to your network. For this, you can use the built-in content editor, which is pretty straightforward:

The LinkedIn post editor.

When you publish original content on LinkedIn, make sure to add relevant hashtags to your articles as well. You can do so by clicking on the Add hashtag option in the publishing window:

Adding hashtags to a post in LinkedIn.

Earlier on, we suggested you follow hashtags relevant to your field. Other LinkedIn users do as well, so adding some to your articles will help people in your industry find your content on their own homepages.

Another option is to post links to external content you’ve written, which offers the advantage of enabling you to direct traffic to your website or other platforms. This may help potential employers get to know more about you and your qualifications.

Publishing relevant think-pieces can help establish yourself as someone to follow on LinkedIn. Succesful posts will enable you to grow your network, and if you do it enough, they might help you land the job offers you’re looking for.

Conclusion

Optimizing your LinkedIn profile is a smart starting point when you first join the platform. However, your homepage can also be a powerful way to get attention from the people you want to network with. Your feed can help you find recruiters, top talent, and other connections you might not otherwise come across.

As for how to get the most out of your LinkedIn homepage, here are four quick tips:

  1. Follow people, companies, and topics to feed relevant content to your LinkedIn homepage.
  2. Expand your LinkedIn network so your homepage displays content from your connections.
  3. Interact with publications from persons of interest on your LinkedIn homepage.
  4. Publish content tailored to your desired audience so others see your work.

Do you have any questions about how to improve your LinkedIn homepage? Let’s talk about them in the comments section below!

Article image thumbnail by gamegfx / shutterstock.com

The post How to Create the Best LinkedIn Homepage for Your Account appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

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https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/business/how-to-create-the-best-linkedin-homepage-for-your-account 2387970@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Tue, 17 Dec 2019 12:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[GC & Fripp]]>

Robert Fripp will be leading an introduction to the Guitar Circle on October 22nd - 26th 2020. The course takes place in Saratoga Springs, NY and is open to guitar players and music-lovers of all levels, interests, and tastes. Along with Robert, other members of the team include several luminaries of the Guitar Craft world including ex-LoCG members Curt Golden and Paul Richards, the latter known for his work as a member of the California Guitar Trio.

For full details of the course, costs and registration please click here

 

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https://www.dgmlive.com/news/Robert Fripp leads new Guitar Circle 2387400@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Mon, 16 Dec 2019 17:06:32 GMT
<![CDATA[How to Create a Custom Footer with Divi’s Theme Builder]]> The Divi Theme Builder marks a new era and changes the way we design websites. One of the most important parts of this feature is being able to dynamically add global footers to your pages and posts. Once you’ve designed a footer, you can automatically add it to whatever kind of page or post you want using Divi’s Theme Builder. Now in this tutorial, we’ll guide you step by step through the process of creating and adding a global footer to your website. You’ll be able to download the template JSON file for free as well!

Let’s get to it.

Preview

Before we dive into the tutorial, let’s take a quick look at the global footer design across different screen sizes.

Desktop

global footer

Mobile

global footer

Download The Custom Global Footer for FREE

To lay your hands on the free custom global footer, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber, you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

Subscribe To Our Youtube Channel

1. Go to Divi’s Theme Builder

Start by going to the Theme Builder in your Divi Theme Options.

global footer

2. Add & Build Global Footer

There, you can add a global footer from your Divi library or start building one from scratch. In this tutorial, we’ll create a custom footer from scratch so go ahead and pick the first option.

global footer

Add Section #1

Background Color

Time to start creating! Open the section you can find on the page and change the section’s background color.

  • Background Color: #000000

global footer

Spacing

Modify the section’s spacing settings next.

  • Top Margin: 6vw
  • Left Margin: 6vw
  • Right Margin: 6vw
  • Left Padding: 30px
  • Right Padding: 30px

global footer

Border

Add some top left and right border next.

  • Top Left: 20px
  • Top Right: 20px

global footer

Box Shadow

Include a box shadow in the section settings too.

  • Box Shadow Blur Strength: rgba(0,0,0,0.18)
  • Shadow Color: rgba(0,0,0,0.18)

global footer

Add New Row to Section

Column Structure

Continue by adding a row to your section using the following column structure:

global footer

Add Text Module to Column

Add H2 Content

Add a Text Module with some H2 content.

global footer

H2 Text Settings

Move on to the module’s design tab and change the H2 text settings accordingly:

  • Heading 2 Font: Poppins
  • Heading 2 Font Weight: Semi Bold
  • Heading 2 Text Alignment: Center
  • Heading 2 Text Color: #ffffff
  • Heading 2 Text Size: 31px (Desktop), 24px (Tablet), 18px (Phone)
  • Heading 2 Line Height: 1.6em

global footer

Sizing

Add some max width to the module as well.

  • Max Width: 700px

global footer

Add Button Module to Column

Add Copy

Add a Button Module right below the Text Module in your column and enter some copy of your choice.

global footer

Alignment

Move on to the module’s design tab and change the button alignment to center.

  • Button Alignment: Center

global footer

Button Settings

Continue by styling the button.

  • Use Custom Styles For Button: Yes
  • Button Text Size: 12px
  • Button Text Color: #000000
  • Button Background Color: #FFFFFF
  • Button Border Width: 0px

global footer

  • Button Border Radius: 100px
  • Button Letter Spacing: 1px
  • Button Font: Poppins
  • Button Font Weight: Semi Bold
  • Button Font Style: Uppercase

global footer

Spacing

Add some custom padding values as well.

  • Top Padding: 14px
  • Bottom Padding: 14px
  • Left Padding: 40px
  • Right Padding: 58px

global footer

Add Section #2

Background Color

On to the next regular section! Choose a white section background color.

  • Background Color: #ffffff

global footer

Spacing

Remove all top and bottom padding next.

  • Top Padding: 0px
  • Bottom Padding: 0px

global footer

Border

Add some border radius to the section too.

  • Top Left: 20px
  • Top Right: 20px

global footer

Box Shadow

And complete the section’s settings by adding a subtle box shadow.

  • Box Shadow Blur Strength: 135px
  • Shadow Color: rgba(0,0,0,0.18)

global footer

Add New Row to Section

Column Structure

Once you’ve completed the section settings, add a new row using the following column structure:

global footer

Sizing

Without adding any modules yet, open the row settings and allow the row to take up the entire width of the screen.

  • Use Custom Gutter Width: Yes
  • Gutter Width: 1
  • Equalize Column Heights: Yes
  • Width: 100%
  • Max Width: 100%

global footer

Spacing

Remove the row’s default top and bottom padding next.

  • Top Padding: 0px
  • Bottom Padding: 0px

global footer

Column Spacing

Continue by opening the column settings and add some custom padding values across different screen sizes.

  • Top Padding: 100px (Desktop), 50px (Tablet & Phone)
  • Bottom Padding: 100px (Desktop), 50px (Tablet & Phone)
  • Left Padding: 50px
  • Right Padding: 50px

global footer

Add Text Module #1 to Column

Add Content

Time to start adding modules! Add a regular Text Module to column 1 and insert some content of your choice.

global footer

Text Settings

Move on to the module’s design tab and change the text settings accordingly:

  • Text Font: Poppins
  • Text Font Weight: Bold
  • Text Color: #000000
  • Text Size: 17px
  • Text Alignment: Center

global footer

Spacing

Add some custom top and bottom margin next.

  • Top Margin: 10px
  • Bottom Margin: 30px

global footer

Add Divider Module to Column

Visibility

Right below the Text Module, add a Divider Module and make sure the ‘Show Divider’ option is enabled.

  • Show Divider: Yes

global footer

Line

Change the line color into black.

  • Line Color: #000000

global footer

Sizing

Modify the divider’s sizing settings too.

  • Width: 15%
  • Module Alignment: Center

global footer

Add Text Module #2 to Column

Add Content

Continue by adding another Text Module to the column.

global footer

Add Link

Add a link to the page you want this module to refer to.

global footer

Text Settings

Then, move on to the design tab and change the text settings as follows:

  • Text Font: Poppins
  • Text Font Weight: Light
  • Text Color: #777777
  • Text Size: 15px
  • Text Alignment: Center

global footer

Spacing

Add some top and bottom margin too.

  • Top Margin: 10px
  • Bottom Margin: 10px

global footer

Clone Text Module #2 As Much as Needed

Once you’ve completed the second Text Module in the column, you can clone it up to as many times as you need it (depending on how many clickable footer items you want to include).

global footer

Change Content & Links

Make sure you change the module content and links for each duplicate.

global footer

Clone Entire Column Twice

Once you’ve completed the column and its modules, you can clone the entire column twice.

global footer

Column 2 Background Color

Then, open the column 2 settings and change the background color.

  • Column 2 Background Color: #f9f9f9

global footer

Change Content & Links

Make sure you change all the content and links in each duplicate column.

global footer

Add New Column

Then, add a fourth column to the row.

global footer

Background Color

Change the new column’s background color.

  • Background Color: #0fffc7

global footer

Spacing

Along with the column’s padding values.

  • Top Padding: 70px
  • Bottom Padding: 70px
  • Left Padding: 50px
  • Right Padding: 50px

global footer

Add Social Media Follow Module to Column 4

Add Social Networks

Continue by adding a Social Media Follow Module to column 4.

global footer

Reset Social Network Styles

Reset the item styles for each social network you add.

global footer

Alignment

Then, move on to the design tab and change the module alignment.

  • Module Alignment: Center

global footer

Icon Settings

Modify the icon color too.

  • Icon Color: #000000

global footer

Add Email Optin Module to Column 4

Remove Content

Continue by adding an Email Optin Module to column 4 and remove the title and body content.

global footer

Email Account

Add an email account next. Without adding the email account, the module won’t show up once you’ve exited the builder.

global footer

Remove Background Color

Continue by removing the module’s background color.

  • Use Background Color: No

global footer

Fields Settings

Move on to the design tab and change the fields settings as follows:

  • Fields Background Color: rgba(0,0,0,0)
  • Fields Text Color: #000000
  • Fields Font: Poppins

global footer

  • Fields Text Size: 13px
  • Fields Border Width: 1px
  • Fields Border Color: #000000

global footer

Button Settings

Style the button of your module as well.

  • Use Custom Styles For Button: Yes
  • Button Text Size: 12px
  • Button Text Color: #000000
  • Button Background Color: #FFFFFF
  • Button Border Width: 0px

global footer

  • Button Border Radius: 100px
  • Button Letter Spacing: 1px
  • Button Font: Poppins
  • Button Font Weight: Semi Bold
  • Button Font Style: Uppercase

global footer

  • Top Padding: 15px
  • Bottom Padding: 15px

global footer

Add Dynamic Text Module to Column 4

Dynamic Content

The next and last module we need to complete this design is a Text Module. Enable the dynamic content option in the content box.

global footer

Then, select the ‘Current Date’ option.

  • Dynamic Content: Current Date

global footer

And modify the dynamic content’s settings as follows:

  • Before: Copyright &copy;
  • After: | All Rights Reserved
  • Date Format: Custom
  • Custom Date Format: 20y

global footer

Text Settings

Then, move on to the design tab and change the text settings accordingly:

  • Text Font: Poppins
  • Text Color: #000000
  • Text Size: 16px

global footer

Spacing

Complete the module’s settings by adding some top margin and you’re done!

  • Top Margin: 50px

global footer

Preview

Now that we’ve gone through all the steps, let’s take a final look at the outcome across different screen sizes.

Desktop

global footer

Mobile

global footer

Final Thoughts

In this tutorial, we’ve shown you how easy it is to create a beautiful custom global footer with Divi’s new Theme Builder. The Theme Builder and Divi’s built-in module and design options help you save a lot of time and create stunning websites in no time. We hope this tutorial inspires you to create beautiful global footers for your upcoming Divi projects. If you have any questions or suggestions, feel free to leave a comment in the comment section below!

If you’re eager to learn more about Divi and get more Divi freebies, make sure you subscribe to our email newsletter and YouTube channel so you’ll always be one of the first people to know and get benefits from this free content.

The post How to Create a Custom Footer with Divi’s Theme Builder appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/how-to-create-a-custom-footer-with-divis-theme-builder 2349507@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Fri, 25 Oct 2019 16:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[How to Untie a Tight Knot]]>

There are numerous ways to tie a knot, from the hundreds of established knots and time-tested techniques to the more avant-garde, improvisational knots that we’re all guilty of using from time to time. Often, it’s the knots we make up that end up being the hardest to use, and the most difficult to untie. But, an overly tight or tangled knot can result from even the simplest of overhand knots. When knots have to hold back extreme loads or survive harsh weather conditions, they become incredibly tight, stiff, and stubborn to untie.  

Faced with a particularly tight knot, the worst thing to do is yank on the loose ends, hoping for something to pop free. If the knot is wet, wait until it dries to attempt untying it. And, if tight knots are something you face regularly, consider getting a marlinspike. Marlinspikes are tapered metal devices used by sailors and others in the marine industry to help untie burly knots in a hurry. If you don’t have a marlinspike, the methods shown here can help you get that tricky knot untied. Keep in mind, the best way to untie your troublesome knot will likely involve a combination of these techniques.  

Like this illustrated guide? Then you’re going to love our book The Illustrated Art of Manliness! Pick up a copy on Amazon.

Illustrated by Ted Slampyak

The post How to Untie a Tight Knot appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

]]>
https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/how-to-untie-a-tight-knot/ 2348942@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Thu, 24 Oct 2019 16:17:13 GMT
<![CDATA[Download the Fifth FREE Theme Builder Pack for Divi]]> Hey Divi Nation, thanks for joining us in a very special installment of our ongoing Divi design initiative.  Today we’re sharing the fifth theme builder pack that’ll help you set up a website from A to Z.  This theme builder pack is part of our big Divi 4.0 celebration. We want to give back to you, the Divi community, by providing you with 6 awesome theme builder packs that you can use right away.

So, let’s take a quick look at the fifth theme builder pack and how to use it!

divi layout

What is Divi 4.0 And
The Divi Theme Builder?

Learn More About Divi 4.0

Introducing The Divi Theme Builder

The Divi Theme Builder is a fully-featured website templating system that allows you to use the Divi Builder to structure your website and edit any part of the Divi Theme including headers, footers, post templates, category templates and more. Each Theme Builder template consists of a custom Header, Footer and Body layout. These three areas can be built and customized using the Divi Builder and its full set of modules along with Dynamic Content.

Learn More About Divi 4.0

divi layout

Check Out The Fifth
Theme Builder Pack Below

Get it for FREE today!

Global Header Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Global Footer Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Post Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Product Page Template

View The Live Layout Demo

404 Page Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Category Page Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Key Features

This fifth theme builder pack comes with beautifully designed elements including a global header with multiple CTAs and a search bar. The global footer has a georgeous background that really makes the content pop. The product, post, and category page templates are designed to add clarity to the content and make CTAs stand out with bright colors. And the 404 page is spectacular! It should fit many website styles and allow you to bring the best out of your next Divi project!

Live Demos

Click the links below to see a live demo for each of the layouts included in the pack.

  1. Theme Builder Pack 5 Post Template (live demo)
  2. Theme Builder Pack 5 Product Page Template (live demo)
  3. Theme Builder Pack 5 404 Template (live demo)
  4. Theme Builder Pack Category Page Template (live demo)

Download The Theme Builder Pack

To use the first theme builder pack on your own Divi website, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

How To Import The Theme Builder Pack

Subscribe To Our Youtube Channel

Once you have downloaded the theme builder pack, locate the divi-theme-builder-pack-5.zip file in your downloads folder on your computer. Double click the folder to unzip it and then navigate inside the divi-theme-builder-pack-5 folder. Inside this folder, you will find one file that contains all the different templates and an individual file for each separate template as well.

To upload the Theme Builder Pack to your website, go to your WordPress Dashboard > Divi > Theme Builder. You can select the individual layout you desire or choose the ‘all’ file to important everything at once.

  • divi-theme-builder-pack-5-all.json
  • divi-theme-builder-pack-5-default-website-template.json
  • divi-theme-builder-pack-5-product-page-template.json
  • divi-theme-builder-pack-5-post-template.json
  • divi-theme-builder-pack-5-category-page-template.json
  • divi-theme-builder-pack-5-404-page-template.json

architecture website pack

Important: when you import the files without unchecking the boxes, the templates will automatically affect your entire website. Make sure you double-check these options before uploading a file.

architecture website pack

No Licensing Restrictions

The photos included with these templates have no licensing restrictions. This means you can use them in all of your commercial projects without having to worry about paying licensing fees or attributing the photographer. Use them in your commercial websites, sell them within your Divi child themes, include them in your own Divi layout packs or just use them on your blog. We know how challenging it can be to find good photos and how confusing and scary the licensing that governs those photos can be. We want to fix that problem for our users.

Download the Full Res Image Assets

The Sixth Theme Builder is Coming Your Way Tomorrow!

We hope you enjoy this theme builder pack. We look forward to hearing your opinions in the comment section below. Make sure you check back tomorrow for another beautiful theme builder!

divi layout

Win A Free iPad Pro!

When we announced the countdown to Divi 4.0, we gave away a free MacBook Pro. Now that Divi 4.0 has arrived we thought to ourselves…why not give away an iPad Pro too? 😁To enter the giveaway, simply complete as many of the raffle options below that you can. The more entries you submit, the better chance you have to win.

Win A Free iPad Pro!

The post Download the Fifth FREE Theme Builder Pack for Divi appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/download-the-fifth-free-theme-builder-pack-for-divi 2347386@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Tue, 22 Oct 2019 12:00:11 GMT
<![CDATA[Download the Fourth FREE Theme Builder Pack for Divi]]> Hey Divi Nation, thanks for joining us in a very special installment of our ongoing Divi design initiative.  Today we’re sharing the fourth theme builder pack that’ll help you set up a website from A to Z.  This theme builder pack is part of our big Divi 4.0 celebration. We want to give back to you, the Divi community, by providing you with 6 awesome theme builder packs that you can use right away.

So, let’s take a quick look at the fourth theme builder pack and how to use it!

divi layout

What is Divi 4.0 And
The Divi Theme Builder?

Learn More About Divi 4.0

Introducing The Divi Theme Builder

The Divi Theme Builder is a fully-featured website templating system that allows you to use the Divi Builder to structure your website and edit any part of the Divi Theme including headers, footers, post templates, category templates and more. Each Theme Builder template consists of a custom Header, Footer and Body layout. These three areas can be built and customized using the Divi Builder and its full set of modules along with Dynamic Content.

Learn More About Divi 4.0

divi layout

Check Out The Fourth
Theme Builder Pack Below

Get it for FREE today!

Global Header Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Global Footer Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Post Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Product Page Template

View The Live Layout Demo

404 Page Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Category Page Template

View The Live Layout Demo

Key Features

The fourth theme builder pack comes with more unique templates that will help automate the way you add products, build posts and create new category pages. The design includes beautiful abstract shape backgrounds that bring a vibrant color to page templates. The global header includes an effectively large “contact us” button. The 404 template is creative and clever. And the product and category templates are refreshingly unique. I’m sure this one will come in handy for a future Divi project!

Live Demos

Click the links below to see a live demo for each of the layouts included in the pack.

  1. Theme Builder Pack 4 Post Template (live demo)
  2. Theme Builder Pack 4 Product Page Template (live demo)
  3. Theme Builder Pack 4 404 Template (live demo)
  4. Theme Builder Pack Category Page Template (live demo)

Download The Theme Builder Pack

To use the first theme builder pack on your own Divi website, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

How To Import The Theme Builder Pack

Subscribe To Our Youtube Channel

Once you have downloaded the theme builder pack, locate the divi-theme-builder-pack-4.zip file in your downloads folder on your computer. Double click the folder to unzip it and then navigate inside the divi-theme-builder-pack-4 folder. Inside this folder, you will find one file that contains all the different templates and an individual file for each separate template as well.

To upload the Theme Builder Pack to your website, go to your WordPress Dashboard > Divi > Theme Builder. You can select the individual layout you desire or choose the ‘all’ file to important everything at once.

  • theme-builder-pack-4-all.json
  • theme-builder-pack-4-default-website-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-4-product-page-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-4-post-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-4-category-page-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-4-404-page-template.json

architecture website pack

Important: when you import the files without unchecking the boxes, the templates will automatically affect your entire website. Make sure you double-check these options before uploading a file.

architecture website pack

No Licensing Restrictions

The photos included with these templates have no licensing restrictions. This means you can use them in all of your commercial projects without having to worry about paying licensing fees or attributing the photographer. Use them in your commercial websites, sell them within your Divi child themes, include them in your own Divi layout packs or just use them on your blog. We know how challenging it can be to find good photos and how confusing and scary the licensing that governs those photos can be. We want to fix that problem for our users.

Download the Full Res Image Assets

The Fifth Theme Builder is Coming Your Way Tomorrow!

We hope you enjoy this theme builder pack. We look forward to hearing your opinions in the comment section below. Make sure you check back tomorrow for another beautiful theme builder!

divi layout

Win A Free iPad Pro!

When we announced the countdown to Divi 4.0, we gave away a free MacBook Pro. Now that Divi 4.0 has arrived we thought to ourselves…why not give away an iPad Pro too? 😁To enter the giveaway, simply complete as many of the raffle options below that you can. The more entries you submit, the better chance you have to win.

Win A Free iPad Pro!

The post Download the Fourth FREE Theme Builder Pack for Divi appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/download-the-fourth-free-theme-builder-pack-for-divi 2346752@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Mon, 21 Oct 2019 12:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[Download The Third FREE Theme Builder Pack For Divi]]> Hey Divi Nation, thanks for joining us in a very special installment of our ongoing Divi design initiative.  Today we’re sharing the third theme builder pack that’ll help you set up a website from A to Z.  This theme builder pack is part of our big Divi 4.0 celebration. We want to give back to you, the Divi community, by providing you with 6 awesome theme builder packs that you can use right away.

So, let’s take a quick look at the third theme builder pack and how to use it!

divi layout

What is Divi 4.0 And
The Divi Theme Builder?

Learn More About Divi 4.0

Introducing The Divi Theme Builder

The Divi Theme Builder is a fully-featured website templating system that allows you to use the Divi Builder to structure your website and edit any part of the Divi Theme including headers, footers, post templates, category templates and more. Each Theme Builder template consists of a custom Header, Footer and Body layout. These three areas can be built and customized using the Divi Builder and its full set of modules along with Dynamic Content.

Learn More About Divi 4.0

divi layout

Check Out The Third
Theme Builder Pack Below

Get it for free today!

theme builder pack 3

Global Header Template

theme builder pack 3

View The Live Layout Demo

Global Footer Template

theme builder pack 3

View The Live Layout Demo

Post Template

theme builder pack 3

View The Live Layout Demo

Product Page Template

theme builder pack 3

View The Live Layout Demo

404 Page Template

theme builder pack 3

View The Live Layout Demo

Category Page Template

theme builder pack 3

View The Live Layout Demo

Key Features

The third theme builder pack is beautiful and matches many web design styles. The global header is simple but elegant and includes all the elements your website might need. The footer has a gorgeous signup form. You’ll definitely find yourself reaching for this theme builder pack when creating professional and business-oriented websites!

Live Demos

Click the links below to see a live demo for each of the layouts included in the pack.

  1. Theme Builder Pack 3 Post Template (live demo)
  2. Theme Builder Pack 3 Product Page Template (live demo)
  3. Theme Builder Pack 3 404 Template (live demo)
  4. Theme Builder Pack 3 Category Page Template (live demo)

Download The Theme Builder Pack

To use the third theme builder pack on your own Divi website, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

How To Import The Theme Builder Pack

Subscribe To Our Youtube Channel

Once you have downloaded the theme builder pack, locate the divi-theme-builder-pack-3.zip file in your downloads folder on your computer. Double click the folder to unzip it and then navigate inside the divi-theme-builder-pack-3 folder. Inside this folder, you will find one file that contains all the different templates and an individual file for each separate template as well.

To upload the Theme Builder Pack to your website, go to your WordPress Dashboard > Divi > Theme Builder. You can select the individual layout you desire or choose the ‘all’ file to important everything at once.

  • theme-builder-pack-3-all.json
  • theme-builder-pack-3-default-website-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-3-product-page-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-3-post-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-3-category-page-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-3-404-page-template.json

architecture website pack

Important: when you import the files without unchecking the boxes, the templates will automatically affect your entire website. Make sure you double-check these options before uploading a file.

theme builder pack 2

No Licensing Restrictions

theme builder pack 1

The photos included with these templates have no licensing restrictions. This means you can use them in all of your commercial projects without having to worry about paying licensing fees or attributing the photographer. Use them in your commercial websites, sell them within your Divi child themes, include them in your own Divi layout packs or just use them on your blog. We know how challenging it can be to find good photos and how confusing and scary the licensing that governs those photos can be. We want to fix that problem for our users.
Download the Full Res Image Assets

The Fourth Theme Builder Pack is Coming Your Way Tomorrow!

We hope you enjoy this theme builder pack. We look forward to hearing your opinions in the comment section below. Make sure you check back tomorrow for another beautiful theme builder pack!

divi layout

Win A Free iPad Pro!

When we announced the countdown to Divi 4.0, we gave away a free MacBook Pro. Now that Divi 4.0 has arrived we thought to ourselves…why not give away an iPad Pro too? 😁To enter the giveaway, simply complete as many of the raffle options below that you can. The more entries you submit, the better chance you have to win.

Win A Free iPad Pro!

The post Download The Third FREE Theme Builder Pack For Divi appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/download-the-third-free-theme-builder-pack-for-divi 2346315@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Sun, 20 Oct 2019 12:00:21 GMT
<![CDATA[Download The Second FREE Theme Builder Pack For Divi]]> Hey Divi Nation, thanks for joining us in a very special installment of our ongoing Divi design initiative.  Today we’re sharing the second theme builder pack that’ll help you set up a website from A to Z.  This theme builder pack is part of our big Divi 4.0 celebration. We want to give back to you, the Divi community, by providing you with 6 awesome theme builder packs that you can use right away.

So, let’s take a quick look at the second theme builder pack and how to use it!

divi layout

What is Divi 4.0 And
The Divi Theme Builder?

Learn More About Divi 4.0

Introducing The Divi Theme Builder

The Divi Theme Builder is a fully-featured website templating system that allows you to use the Divi Builder to structure your website and edit any part of the Divi Theme including headers, footers, post templates, category templates and more. Each Theme Builder template consists of a custom Header, Footer and Body layout. These three areas can be built and customized using the Divi Builder and its full set of modules along with Dynamic Content.

Learn More About Divi 4.0

divi layout

Check Out The Second
Theme Builder Pack Below

Get it for free today!

theme builder pack 2

Global Header Template

theme builder pack 2

View The Live Layout Demo

Global Footer Template

theme builder pack 2

View The Live Layout Demo

Post Template

theme builder pack 2

View The Live Layout Demo

Product Page Template

theme builder pack 2

View The Live Layout Demo

404 Page Template

theme builder pack 2

View The Live Layout Demo

Category Page Template

theme builder pack 2

View The Live Layout Demo

Key Features

For the second theme builder pack, Kenny and his team have turned the Elegant Themes website into different templates that you can use for your upcoming Divi project. The theme builder pack includes a user-friendly post template and a footer template with an eye-catching CTA design.

Live Demos

Click the links below to see a live demo for each of the layouts included in the pack.

  1. Theme Builder Pack 2 Post Template (live demo)
  2. Theme Builder Pack 2 Product Page Template (live demo)
  3. Theme Builder Pack 2 404 Template (live demo)
  4. Theme Builder Pack 2 Category Page Template (live demo)

Download The Theme Builder Pack

To use the second theme builder pack on your own Divi website, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

How To Import The Theme Builder Pack

Subscribe To Our Youtube Channel

Once you have downloaded the theme builder pack, locate the divi-theme-builder-pack-2.zip file in your downloads folder on your computer. Double click the folder to unzip it and then navigate inside the divi-theme-builder-pack-2 folder. Inside this folder, you will find one file that contains all the different templates and an individual file for each separate template as well.

To upload the Theme Builder Pack to your website, go to your WordPress Dashboard > Divi > Theme Builder. You can select the individual layout you desire or choose the ‘all’ file to important everything at once.

  • theme-builder-pack-2-all.json
  • theme-builder-pack-2-default-website-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-2-product-page-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-2-post-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-2-category-page-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-2-404-page-template.json

architecture website pack

Important: when you import the files without unchecking the boxes, the templates will automatically affect your entire website. Make sure you double-check these options before uploading a file.

theme builder pack 2

No Licensing Restrictions

theme builder pack 2

The photos included with these templates have no licensing restrictions. This means you can use them in all of your commercial projects without having to worry about paying licensing fees or attributing the photographer. Use them in your commercial websites, sell them within your Divi child themes, include them in your own Divi layout packs or just use them on your blog. We know how challenging it can be to find good photos and how confusing and scary the licensing that governs those photos can be. We want to fix that problem for our users.

Download the Full Res Image Assets

The Third Theme Builder Pack is Coming Your Way Tomorrow!

We hope you enjoy this theme builder pack. We look forward to hearing your opinions in the comment section below. Make sure you check back tomorrow for another beautiful theme builder pack!

divi layout

Win A Free iPad Pro!

When we announced the countdown to Divi 4.0, we gave away a free MacBook Pro. Now that Divi 4.0 has arrived we thought to ourselves…why not give away an iPad Pro too? 😁To enter the giveaway, simply complete as many of the raffle options below that you can. The more entries you submit, the better chance you have to win.

Win A Free iPad Pro!

The post Download The Second FREE Theme Builder Pack For Divi appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/download-the-second-free-theme-builder-pack-for-divi 2345860@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Sat, 19 Oct 2019 16:00:56 GMT
<![CDATA[Download The First FREE Theme Builder Pack For Divi]]> Hey Divi Nation, thanks for joining us in a very special installment of our ongoing Divi design initiative.  Today we’re sharing the first theme builder pack that’ll help you set up a website from A to Z.  This theme builder pack is part of our big Divi 4.0 celebration. We want to give back to you, the Divi community, by providing you with 6 awesome theme builder packs that you can use right away.

So, let’s take a quick look at the first theme builder pack and how to use it!

divi layout

What is Divi 4.0 And
The Divi Theme Builder?

Learn More About Divi 4.0

Introducing The Divi Theme Builder

The Divi Theme Builder is a fully-featured website templating system that allows you to use the Divi Builder to structure your website and edit any part of the Divi Theme including headers, footers, post templates, category templates and more. Each Theme Builder template consists of a custom Header, Footer and Body layout. These three areas can be built and customized using the Divi Builder and its full set of modules along with Dynamic Content.

Learn More About Divi 4.0

divi layout

Check Out The First
Theme Builder Pack Below

Get it for free today!

theme builder pack 1

Global Header Template

theme builder pack 1

View The Live Layout Demo

Global Footer Template

theme builder pack 1

View The Live Layout Demo

Post Template

theme builder pack 1

View The Live Layout Demo

Product Page Template

theme builder pack 1

View The Live Layout Demo

404 Page Template

theme builder pack 1

View The Live Layout Demo

Category Page Template

theme builder pack 1

View The Live Layout Demo

Key Features

We’re sure you’re going to love the first theme builder pack, built with Divi’s new Theme Builder. The theme builder pack comes with multiple templates that automate the way you add products, build posts and create new categories. The design style that was handled for this theme builder pack is both minimal and abstract. It fits many website styles and allows you to bring the best out of your next Divi project!

Live Demos

Click the links below to see a live demo for each of the layouts included in the pack.

  1. Theme Builder Pack 1 Post Template (live demo)
  2. Theme Builder Pack 1 Product Page Template (live demo)
  3. Theme Builder Pack 1 404 Template (live demo)
  4. Theme Builder Pack 1 Category Page Template (live demo)

Download The Theme Builder Pack

To use the first theme builder pack on your own Divi website, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

How To Import The Theme Builder Pack

Subscribe To Our Youtube Channel

Once you have downloaded the theme builder pack, locate the divi-theme-builder-pack-1.zip file in your downloads folder on your computer. Double click the folder to unzip it and then navigate inside the divi-theme-builder-pack-1 folder. Inside this folder, you will find one file that contains all the different templates and an individual file for each separate template as well.

To upload the Theme Builder Pack to your website, go to your WordPress Dashboard > Divi > Theme Builder. You can select the individual layout you desire or choose the ‘all’ file to important everything at once.

  • theme-builder-pack-1-all.json
  • theme-builder-pack-1-default-website-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-1-product-page-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-1-post-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-1-category-page-template.json
  • theme-builder-pack-1-404-page-template.json

theme builder pack 1

Important: when you import the files without unchecking the boxes, the templates will automatically affect your entire website. Make sure you double-check these options before uploading a file.

theme builder pack 1

No Licensing Restrictions

theme builder pack 1

The photos included with these templates have no licensing restrictions. This means you can use them in all of your commercial projects without having to worry about paying licensing fees or attributing the photographer. Use them in your commercial websites, sell them within your Divi child themes, include them in your own Divi layout packs or just use them on your blog. We know how challenging it can be to find good photos and how confusing and scary the licensing that governs those photos can be. We want to fix that problem for our users.

Download the Full Res Image Assets

The Second Theme Builder Pack is Coming Your Way Tomorrow!

We hope you enjoy this theme builder pack. We look forward to hearing your opinions in the comment section below. Make sure you check back tomorrow for another beautiful theme builder pack!

divi layout

Win A Free iPad Pro!

When we announced the countdown to Divi 4.0, we gave away a free MacBook Pro. Now that Divi 4.0 has arrived we thought to ourselves…why not give away an iPad Pro too? 😁To enter the giveaway, simply complete as many of the raffle options below that you can. The more entries you submit, the better chance you have to win.

Win A Free iPad Pro!

The post Download The First FREE Theme Builder Pack For Divi appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/download-the-first-free-theme-builder-pack-for-divi 2345298@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Fri, 18 Oct 2019 16:00:50 GMT
<![CDATA[How to Use Discourse Community Forums with WordPress]]> Discourse is one of the most popular community forums software platforms available today. Unlike a lot of its competitors (bbPress, BuddyPress), Discourse doesn’t natively run off of the WordPress architecture. It has to be contained on its own server. That shouldn’t scare you, though. The developers understand that 1/3 of the internet can’t be ignored, so they made it exceptionally easy to make these two powerhouse platforms play nice with each other. With the official Discourse WordPress plugin, you can make these two platforms interact like they were made with the other in mind.

Integrating WordPress and Discourse

We are going to do this is by using the WP Discourse plugin. It’s the official release by the devs, and it will let you do two primary things.

  • Simultaneously publish to Discourse any posts you create in WordPress, starting a new thread on the forum
  • Publish any replies within that Discourse thread to the WordPress post as a comment.

By doing this, you will essentially have a Disqus-like comment system that’s under your own control. You will also

Unfortunately, Discourse doesn’t support embedding an entire Category (what Discourse calls the individual forums) into a WordPress post or page content area. You can turn off WordPress-specific comments to only have Discourse as your method of discussion. To comment, someone must be registered through your Discourse community forum.

Why Requiring Discourse Registration is Good

Adding that extra level of friction to leaving a comment might seem like a bad idea at first. But if you’re set on building up your Discourse community, it’s not. Doing so accomplishes three things:

  • It directs people to your forums so they see more of your content and how engaged your community is. This is not the case with a traditional commenting system, even an integrated one such as Disqus.
  • You gain members of your community, not simply one-off commentors. These people tend to be more engaged and more likely to stick around. They additionally become a part of your marketing campaigns and lists.
  • Spam comments slow down. Brute-force WordPress attacks and spam campaigns target the traditional comment system. With the registration required, a much more sophisticated level of spambot has to be employed. Most likely, you won’t run into many — if any — of these.

While having discussions and a number of comments on a post is a good thing (great even), having an engaged community made up of regulars who become fans of your content and a dedicated audience is even better.

With That In Mind…SSO

SSO, or Single Sign On, is a kind of middle-ground for that. Setting it up within the WP Discourse plugin settings will allow you to keep your existing WordPress users and allow them use of the Discourse community. The devs don’t necessarily recommend this for a few reasons (including the ones above). The primary one being that Discourse has a strong login flow and database structure, and using SSO breaks that flow.

That said, if you already have a steady community of WordPress user accounts, but want a Discourse forum without requiring an all new membership drive, SSO may be the best way for you to accomplish that.

WP Discourse

WordPress Discourse Forums

To begin the process of using Discourse with WordPress, you need to have a separate installation of Discourse set up. You can follow our guide to set your community forum up on a Digital Ocean Droplet to get started. Once that is finished, you should head over to the WP.org plugin repository to install WP Discourse.

WordPress Discourse Forums

When activated, a new menu option will appear in your WordPress admin panel called Discourse. You see a number of sub-menus that will help ease the integration of a Discourse forum on WordPress.

Connecting Discourse to WordPress

Click on the primary link, and it takes you to the options page where you do the connecting to your Discourse installation.

WordPress Discourse Forums

The URL of your Discourse installation is important. It’s not the IP address of your Digital Ocean Droplet, but instead the actual domain name that you set up during the installation. The username should probably be changed from system to whatever you used as your primary admin user.

The real key here (heh heh, pun intended) is to make sure that your Discourse community has an API Key created. If this wasn’t part of your installation process and set up, you can go to discourse.example.com/admin/api/keys as your admin user and create one with a single click.

WordPress Discourse Forums

You can also navigate to the page via the tabs at the top of your account dashboard. Simply copy the API Key and paste it back into the dashboard of your Discourse plugin options. With that done, navigate to the WordPress user profile that you want to associate with that Discourse admin account. You will see a new field when you select Edit User asking for a Discourse user name.

WordPress Discourse Forums

Publishing and Commenting Options

Then there’s just fine-tuning how you want the comments and posts to appear on each platform. You can choose whether to publish full posts to Discourse, to use those as excerpts to bring people to your main website, and tweak categories, tags, and even the CSS for how the comments appear.

WordPress Discourse Forums

And with Discourse’s built-in trust system, you can set trust levels for people to even be able to comment and access the content so you don’t get inundated with spam or trolls.

Finishing Up

Because it’s not built directly into the WordPress CMS, Discourse might not be the first choice for forum software. However, if you take the time to learn the app and set up a Discourse WordPress integration, you might find your community engagement rise. The initial set up for the community forums might be a little more taxing than one of the WP-based plugins, but when you combine that with the official WP Discourse plugin, opportunities for community growth and engagement are just as easy as anything native in WP.

How do you integrate your forums into WordPress?

Article featured image by magic pictures / shutterstock.com

The post How to Use Discourse Community Forums with WordPress appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/wordpress/how-to-use-discourse-community-forums-with-wordpress 2339436@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Tue, 08 Oct 2019 14:24:46 GMT
<![CDATA[How to Create a Responsive Accordion Slider in Divi]]> An accordion slider is a fun and engaging way to display content in a small space. Accordion sliders usually consist of multiple elements (or panels) stacked horizontally like the folds of a curtain. And when you hover over one of the panels, it expands to reveal content as the other accordion panels contract. This is where we get the accordion type effect of expanding and contracting.

In this tutorial, I’m going to show you how to create a responsive accordion slider in Divi using nothing but CSS. To do this we will be using multiple Divi modules to serve as accordion panels. Any module could be used, but for this example, we are going to use blurb modules in a very creative way to build a beautiful accordion slider that looks (and works) great both on desktop and mobile.

Check it out!

Sneak Peek

Here is a quick peek at what we will be building in this tutorial.

Desktop

divi responsive accordion slider

Tablet and Phone

divi responsive accordion slider

Download the Divi Responsive Accordion Slider Layout for FREE

To lay your hands on the accordion slider designed in this tutorial, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber, you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

To import the layout to your page, simply extract the zip file and drag the json file into the Divi Builder.

Let’s get to the tutorial shall we?

What You Need to Get Started

To get started, you will need to do the following:

  1. If you haven’t yet, install and activate the Divi Theme installed (or the Divi Builder Plugin if not using the Divi Theme).
  2. Create a new page in WordPress and use the Divi Builder to edit the page on the front end (visual builder).
  3. Upload about 5 different mock images to the media library to be used for the background images needed in the tutorial.

After that, you will have a blank canvas to start designing in Divi.

Creating a Responsive Accordion Slider in Divi

Creating the Row

To start, add a one-column row to the regular section.

divi responsive accordion slider

Then open the row settings and update the following:

  • Gutter Width: 1
  • Width: 100%
  • Max Width: 800px
  • Height: 400px (desktop); 700px (tablet and phone)

The width and max width values can be changed to whatever you need. The accordion will scale and function within any row width. Also, it is very important to set a fixed height for the design to work. The child elements (column and modules) will have a height of 100% so if you don’t set the fixed height of the row, the child elements will not have a height at all.

Column Settings

Now that we have a set height for the row, open the column settings and add the following CSS to the main element:
Desktop

display:flex;
flex-direction: row;
align-items:center;
height: 100%;

divi responsive accordion slider

Tablet

flex-direction: column;

The flex property will align the accordion panels horizontally on desktop and vertically on tablet and phone. The 100% height will allow the modules we will add to use the 100% height value as well.

Creating the Accordion Panel with Blurb Modules

The accordion slider can be built using any type of module(s). If we wanted to we could use a combination of different modules to serve as our accordion panel. But for this design, we are going to use blurb modules.

Begin by adding a blurb module to the row.

divi responsive accordion slider

Designing the Blurb Module

Open the blurb module settings and update the following:

Keep the mock title and body content. We can always change that later.

Then update the blurb icon as follows:

  • Icon (desktop): horizontal arrow line icon (see screenshot)

divi responsive accordion slider

  • Icon (hover): check icon (see screenshot)

divi responsive accordion slider

  • Icon (tablet and phone): vertical arrow line icon (see screenshot)

divi responsive accordion slider

Background

Then give the blurb a background image and a gradient overlay on hover as follows:

  • Add a Background Image at least 1000px wide
  • Background Image Position: Center Left

divi responsive accordion slider

Then add a gradient background overlay on hover.

Hover

  • Background Gradient Left Color (hover): #3e215b
  • Background Gradient Right Color (hover): rgba(0,0,0,0)
  • Gradient Direction: 90deg
  • Place Gradient Above Background Image: YES

divi responsive accordion slider

Icon

  • Icon Color: #ffffff
  • Image/Icon Placement: Left

divi responsive accordion slider

Next, jump over to the design tab and update the following:

Title and Body Text

  • Title Font: Poppins
  • Title Font Weight: Semi Bold
  • Title Text Color: transparent (desktop), #ffffff (hover)
  • Title Text Size: 22px
  • Body Text Color: transparent (desktop), #ffffff (hover)

divi responsive accordion slider

Height and Box Shadow

After the text is styled, give the module a 100% height and a box shadow as follows:

  • Height: 100%
  • Box Shadow: See Screenshot
  • Box Shadow Horizontal Position: -12px
  • Box Shadow Vertical Position: 0px

divi responsive accordion slider

Blurb Custom CSS

In order to get our accordion panels (or blurb module) to expand and contract with the rest of the modules, we need to add some custom css to change the size of the module with flex-grow. Since we are going to have a total of 5 modules that make up the accordion, we add “flex:1” for the default state and then change it to “flex:5” on the hover state.

Under the advanced tab, add the following custom CSS the Blurb Main Element:

Desktop

flex:1;
position: relative !important;
transition: flex 800ms !important;

Tablet

flex:5;

divi responsive accordion slider

Then add the following custom css to the Blurb Content CSS:

Desktop

position: absolute !important;
width: 280px;
padding: 20px;
transition: color 400ms;

divi responsive accordion slider

Tablet

width: 100%;
height: 100%;
position: relative !important;

divi responsive accordion slider

Overflow and Transition

  • Horizontal Overflow: hidden
  • Vertical Overflow: hidden
  • Transition Duration : 400ms
  • Transition Speed Curve: Linear

divi responsive accordion slider

Alright! That was some serious customization to a blurb module. But the good news is that all we need to do is duplicate them to create the remaining accordion panels.

Duplicating the Blurbs for More Accordion Panels

Hover over the blurb module and click the duplicate icon four times to create a total of five accordion panels (or modules).

Then update the background images for each of the new blurbs you duplicated.

divi responsive accordion slider

Final Result

Desktop

divi responsive accordion slider

Tablet and Phone

divi responsive accordion slider

Final Thoughts

This responsive accordion slider really does have some unique elements that make it fun to use. The accordion panels expand and contract seamlessly on hover without any unexpected glitches. And the blurb icons change on hover and on mobile in order to boost UX. Hopefully, this design will come in handy for your next project.

I look forward to hearing from you in the comments.

Cheers!

The post How to Create a Responsive Accordion Slider in Divi appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/how-to-create-a-responsive-accordion-slider-in-divi 2336478@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Fri, 04 Oct 2019 16:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[Using Module Backgrounds to Display Inline Parallax Images with Divi]]> Using CSS inline parallax backgrounds can really help enhance your website’s look and feel and this tutorial is the perfect example. We’ll use multiple module backgrounds to create a stunning and coherent outcome that shows multiple parts of your background image. You’ll be able to download the JSON file for free as well!

Let’s get to it.

Preview

Before we dive into the tutorial, let’s take a quick look at the outcome across different screen sizes.

Desktop

Mobile

Download The Inline Parallax Layout for FREE

To lay your hands on the free inline parallax layout, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber, you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

Let’s Start Recreating

Add New Section

Start by adding a new regular section to the page you’re working on.

inline parallax

Add New Row

Column Structure

Continue by adding a new row using the following column structure:

Column 1 Settings

Spacing

Add a top padding value to the first column.

  • Top Padding:
    • Desktop: 2vw
    • Tablet + Phone: 6vw

Column 2 Settings

Spacing

Add a top padding value to the second column as well.

  • Top Padding:
    • Desktop: 4vw
    • Tablet + Phone: 6vw

Column 4 Settings

Spacing

Skip column 3 and add some spacing values to column 4.

  • Top Padding
    • Desktop: 19vw
    • Tablet: 0vw
    • Phone: 1vw
  • Left and Right Padding
    • Desktop and Tablet: 1vw
    • Phone: 0vw

Add 1st Text Module to Column 1

Add H2 Content

Now, add the first text module to column 1. Insert some H2 content of your choice.

Heading Text

Move on to the design tab and change the H2 text settings accordingly:

  • Heading Text Level: H2
  • H2 Font: EB Garamond
  • H2 Font Style: TT
  • H2 Text Color: Black #oooooo
  • H2 Text Size:
    • Desktop: 3.1vw
    • Tablet: 5.4vw
    • Phone: 10vw
  • H2 Line Height:
    • Desktop + Tablet: 1.1em
    • Phone: 1.3em

Spacing

Then, add some spacing to the module.

  • Top Padding:
    • Desktop: 4vw
    • Tablet + Phone: 0vw
  • Left Padding:
    • Desktop and Tablet: 1vw
    • Phone: 2vw
  • Right padding
    • Desktop and Tablet: 1vw
    • Phone: 0vw

Add 2nd Text Module to Column 1

Add content

Now, add a second text module below the first. Insert some paragraph content.

Text

Move on to the design tab and change the text settings as follows:

  • Text Font: EB Garamond
  • Text Color: Dark Grey #3d3d3d
  • Text Size:
    • Desktop: 1vw
    • Tablet: 2.2vw
    • Phone: 3.8vw
  • Text Line Height: 1.8em

Spacing

Adjust the spacing settings of the module next.

  • Bottom Padding:
    • Phone: 4vw
  • Left Padding:
    • Desktop + Tablet: 1.4vw
  • Right Padding:
    • Desktop: 1.3vw
    • Tablet + Phone: 1.7vw

Add Button Module to Column 1

Add Content

To complete the first column, add a button module. Insert some copy.

Add Link

Add a link to the button as well.

Button

Move on to the design tab and style the button settings accordingly:

  • Button Text Size:
    • Desktop: 1vw
    • Tablet: 2vw
    • Phone: 4vw
  • Button Text Color: Dark Grey #3d3d3d
  • Button Border Width: 1px
  • Button Font: EB Garamond

Spacing

Then, adjust the spacing settings of the button.

  • Top Margin:
    • Desktop + Tablet: 1vw
  • Bottom Margin:
    • Phone: 5vw

Add 1st Text Module to Column 2

Add Content

On to the next column! Add a Text Module with some H4 content of your choice.

Background

Continue by adding a background image. Upload a CSS parallax background image for desktop and use a regular image on smaller screen sizes (without CSS parallax).

  • Desktop Background: Image
    • Parallax: CSS
  • Tablet + Phone Background: Image

Background Hover

Next, add a gradient background on hover only.

  • Background Hover: Color Gradient
  • Color Gradient 1: Light Golden Yellow #edba63
  • Color Gradient 2: Golden Yellow #ed9d12
  • Gradient Direction: 23 deg
  • Place Gradient Above Background Image: Yes

Heading Text

Move on to the design tab and change the H4 text settings.

  • Text Heading Level: H4
  • H4 Font: EB Garamond
  • H4 Text Color: White #ffffff
  • H4 Text Size:
    • Desktop: 2.3vw
    • Tablet: 4.5vw
    • Phone: 8.5vw

Spacing

Then, adjust the spacing.

  • Top Margin:
    • Phone: -6vw
  • Top Padding:
    • Desktop: 15vw
    • Tablet: 22vw
    • Phone: 43vw
  • Bottom Padding:
    • Desktop + Tablet: 1vw
  • Left and Right Padding:
    • Desktop and Tablet: 1.5vw
    • Phone: 5vw

Border

Continue by styling the borders.

  • Rounded Corners: 1vw all corners
  • Border Styles: all sides
  • Border Width: 0.3vw
  • Border Color: White #ffffff

Transform Scale Hover

Complete the module’s settings by adding a zoom effect on hover.

  • Transform Scale on Hover: 102%

Add 2nd Text Module to Column 2

Add Content

Add a second module to the second column with some H4 content of your choice.

Background

Just like the previous text module, add a CSS parallax background image on desktop and a regular background image on smaller screen sizes.

  • Desktop Background: Image
    • Parallax: CSS
  • Tablet + Phone Background: Image

Background Hover

Add a hover gradient background too.

  • Background Hover: Color Gradient
  • Color Gradient 1: Light Magenta #91463f
  • Color Gradient 2: Magenta #910400
  • Gradient Direction: 23 deg
  • Place Gradient Above Background Image: Yes

Heading Text

Style the H4 text settings next.

  • Text Heading Level: H4
  • H4 Font: EB Garamond
  • H4 Text Color: White #ffffff
  • H4 Text Size:
    • Desktop: 2.3vw
    • Tablet: 4.5vw
    • Phone: 8.5vw

Spacing

And modify the spacing settings.

  • Top Padding:
    • Desktop: 15vw
    • Tablet: 21.1vw
    • Phone: 43vw
  • Bottom Padding:
    • Desktop + Tablet: 1vw
  • Left and Right Padding:
    • Desktop and Tablet: 1.5vw
    • Phone: 5vw

Border

Change the border settings too.

  • Rounded Corners: 1vw all corners
  • Border Styles: all sides
  • Border Width: 0.3vw
  • Border Color: White #ffffff

Transform Scale Hover

Last but not least, add a zoom in effect to the text module.

  • Transform Scale on Hover: 102%

Duplicate Text Modules from Column 2 to Column 3

Duplicate and drag text modules

Clone both text modules and place them in the third column of the row.

Adjust 1st Text Module in Column 3

Change H4 Content

Open the first duplicate text module in column 3 and change the content.

Change Background For Tablet and Phone

Change the background image on smaller screen sizes next.

Change Color Gradient on Hover

Continue by changing the colors in the gradient hover.

  • Color Gradient 1: Rose Pink #cc9293
  • Color Gradient 2: Pink #cc9293

Spacing

Finally, adjust the spacing as follows.

  • Top Margin:
    • Tablet: -6.4vw
    • Phone: 0vw

Adjust 2nd Text Module in Column 3

Change H4 Content

First, change the content.

Change Background For Tablet and Phone

Then, change the background image on smaller screen sizes.

Change Color Gradient on Hover

Change the gradient background too.

  • Color Gradient 1: Soft Pine #5c755c
  • Color Gradient 2: Pine Green #4D754D

Add 1st Text Module to Column 4

Add Content

Moving on to column 4, add a text module. Insert some H3 content of your choice.

Heading Text

Move on to the design tab and change the H3 text settings as follows:

  • Heading Text Level: H3
  • H3 Text Font: EB Garamond
  • H3 Font Style: TT
  • H3 Text Color: Black #oooooo
  • H3 Text Size:
    • Desktop: 3vw
    • Tablet: 5vw
    • Phone: 12vw
  • H3 Line Height
    • Desktop + Tablet: 1em
    • Phone: 1.1em

Add 2nd Text Module to Column 4

Add content

Add another text module below the first. Insert some paragraph content.

Text

Move on to the design tab and change the text settings accordingly:

  • Text Font: EB Garamond
  • Text Color: Dark Grey #3d3d3d
  • Text Size:
    • Desktop: 1vw
    • Tablet: 2.2vw
    • Phone: 3.8vw
  • Text Line Height: 1.8em

Spacing

Then, adjust the spacing.

  • Bottom Padding:
    • Phone: 4vw
  • Left Padding: 0.9vw
  • Right Padding: 2.2vw

Duplicate Button Module from Column 1 to Column 4

Duplicate and drag the button module

  • Duplicate the button module in column 1.
  • Drag it to column 3 below the text modules.

Spacing

Adjust some spacing values in the duplicated button module and you’re done!

  • Bottom Margin: 0vw
  • Left Margin:
    • Desktop + Tablet: 0.7vw
    • Phone: 0.9vw

Preview

Now that we’ve gone through all the steps, let’s take a final look at the outcome across different screen sizes.

Desktop

Mobile

Conclusion

In this post, we’ve shown you how to create an inline parallax design with four text boxes that show a different part of the same image. We hope you enjoy this design and if you have any questions or suggestions, make sure you leave a comment in the comment section below!

The post Using Module Backgrounds to Display Inline Parallax Images with Divi appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/using-module-backgrounds-to-display-inline-parallax-images-with-divi 2318912@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Fri, 06 Sep 2019 16:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[How to Change Content on Hover to Create Unique CTAs in Divi (3 Ways)]]> Divi’s built-in hover options makes it easy to change the content of any module on hover. We can change background images, colors, and even text on hover. This opens the door for creative ways to grab the attention of users and boost those calls to action for better conversions.

Today, we’ll be showing you how to change content on hover in Divi for some unique calls to action. We’ll show clever ways to change button text (and icons) on hover. We’ll show how to elegantly change the title and button text within a call to action module on hover. And, we’ll even throw in some custom CSS to add some unique transition effects as well (like switching and flipping a button icon).

Check it out!

Sneak Peek

Here is a quick look at the three designs we will be creating today.

#1 How to Change Content on Hover for Buttons

divi change content on hover

#2 How to Change Backgrounds and Body Content on Text Modules

divi change content on hover

#3 How to Change Content on Hover for Multiple Elements with the Call to Action Module

divi change content on hover

Download the Layout for FREE

To lay your hands on the designs from this tutorial, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber, you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

To import the layout to your page, simply extract the zip file and drag the json file into the Divi Builder.

Let’s get to the tutorial shall we?

What You Need to Get Started

To get started, you will need to do the following:

  1. If you haven’t yet, install and activate the Divi Theme installed (or the Divi Builder Plugin if not using the Divi Theme).
  2. Create a new page in WordPress and use the Divi Builder to edit the page on the front end (visual builder).
  3. Load the Cake Maker Landing Page premade layout to the page. We will be using this layout for our designs. You can load the layout by selecting “Choose a Premade Layout” when prompted on deploying the Divi Builder. Or you can select the “Load from Library” plus icon from the settings menu within the Divi Builder. For more info on how to load the premade layout to your page, watch our video.

divi change content on hover

After that, you are ready to start designing in Divi.

#1 How to Change Content on Hover for Buttons

Once you have the Cake Maker Landing Page premade layout loaded to your page, find the main button CTA at the top header of the page and open the button module design settings.

divi change content on hover

Changing Button Text on Hover

Under the content tab, update the button text as follows:

Button Text: “Shop Now”

divi change content on hover

Then deploy the hover option for the button text and enter the replacement button text under the hover tab as follows:

Button Text (hover): “Let’s Go”

divi change content on hover

The text under the hover button text will replace the default button text when hovering over the button.

divi change content on hover

Button Width

However the button is inline-block so the width of the button/link will change according to the amount of content (letters or spaces) the button contains. This doesn’t work well for this hover effect because with smaller replacement text, the button will grow smaller in width and create jumping or glitching when hovering over the edge of the button. To fix this, we need to apply a set width to the button. This is easy with a single snippet of CSS. Add the following CSS to the Main Element of the button module.

width: 200px;

divi change content on hover

Here is the result.

divi change content on hover

Additional Changes and Hover Effects

In addition to changing the content on hover, we can also spice up our button with a different hover effect combinations.

Right now the button icon is a right arrow that is deployed on hover. This works really well with the hover button text “Let’s Go”.

Flipping the Button Icon on Hover

But you can add a nice flip hover effect for the button icon as well. To do this, first make the icon appear always (not just on hover) by updating the following:

Only Show Icon on Hover for Button: NO

divi change content on hover

Then add a CSS Class to the button module as follows:

CSS Class: flip-button-icon

divi change content on hover

Then open the page settings and add the following custom CSS.

.flip-button-icon:after {
  transition: transform 500ms;
}
.flip-button-icon:hover:after {
  transform: rotateX(360deg);
}

divi change content on hover

Here is the result.

divi change content on hover

Changing the Button Icon on Hover

You can also completely change the button icon on hover. All you really need is a small snippet of CSS to replace the content of :after pseudo element where the icon resides.

Before we add the css, first let’s choose a different button icon to show initially, then we can change it to the right arrow with CSS.

Update the Button Icon with the cart icon since our CTA is “Show Now”.

divi change content on hover

Then go to the advanced tab and update the current CSS transform property with a 180 degree rotation instead of 360 degrees. And add a new unicode for the content that displays the left arrow (“\23”).

The new snippet will look like this:


.flip-button-icon:hover:after {
  transform: rotateY(180deg);
  content: "\23"; 
}

Since we will be rotating the icon 180 degrees as well, this will show a right arrow as a replacement of the cart icon when hovering over the button.

Final Result

This is the final result.

divi change content on hover

#2 How to Change Backgrounds and Body Content on Text Modules

For this next design, make your way down the page layout to the “My Services” section. There open the row settings for the top row with the two text modules.

divi change content on hover

Update Column Settings

Under the row settings, open the settings for Column 1 and add a background image on hover to the column.

divi change content on hover

This will replace the white background that is there by default.

Also, add a gradient above the background image on hover as well.

Background Gradient Left Color: rgba(255,255,255,0)
Background Gradient Right Color: rgba(46,41,142,0.75)
Start Position: 30%
Place Gradient Above Background Image: YES

divi change content on hover

This will provide a nice overlay that will make the replacement text on hover more readable.

After that, take out the custom padding for the column by restoring it to the default setting.

divi change content on hover

Customize the Text Module in Column 1

Once the column is updated, save the settings and open the text module settings for the text module in column 1. Then update the text module body content on hover with the following:

<h3>Custom Cakes</h3>
<a href="#">Order Now</a>

This is a nice way to add a call to action with a link on hover.

Next, update the background as follows:

Background Color: #ffffff;
Background Color (hover): rgba(255,255,255,0);

This adds a nice transition element to reveal the background image in the column gradually.

Next update the following design settings:

Height: 260px

divi change content on hover

Padding: 30px top, 30px left, 30px right
Padding (hover): 90px top

divi change content on hover

This will create a nice transition effect that brings the text down gradually when hovering over the text module.

Next, update the text colors to white as follows:

Link Text Color: #ffffff
Heading 3 Text Color (hover): #ffffff

divi change content on hover

To slow down the transition of the hover effects, update the transition duration as follows:

Transition Duration: 500ms

divi change content on hover

Final Result

Now check out the final result.

divi change content on hover

#3 How to Change Content on Hover for Multiple Elements with the Call to Action Module

For this next design, we are going to use a call to action module that changes multiple content elements on hover. To do this, make your way down the page to the Popular Collections section.

divi change content on hover

Add New Call To Action Module

Then add a new call to action module under the “shop now” button in the top row of the specialty section.

divi change content on hover

Update CTA with Changing Content on Hover

Next, update the call to action content as follows:

Title: “Special Offer”
Title (hover): “10% Off”
Button text: “Shop Now”
Button text (hover): “Get Deal”
Body: “Custom Cupcakes”
Button Link URL: #

divi change content on hover

divi change content on hover

Save setting for now.

Copy and Paste Layout Button Styles

We are going to get a jump on designing the button for our CTA. To do this, open the button settings for the button module above the CTA module that came with the premade layout. Then click the triple dot icon on the button option group and select “copy button styles”.

divi change content on hover

Then open the other options menu on the call to action module we are designing and select “Paste Button Styles”.

divi change content on hover

Then open the call to action module settings and update the button padding:

Button Padding: 15px top, 15px bottom, 40px left, 40px right
divi change content on hover

Update Text Styles

After that, update the title and body text design.

Title Heading Level: H4
Title Font: Pacifico
Title Text Size: 9vw
Title Line Height: 1.3em
Body Font: Open Sans
Body Font Weight: Bold
Body Text Size: 18px
Body Letter Spacing: 1px

divi change content on hover

Final Settings

Next, update the padding.

Padding: 0px left, 0px right

Then give the module a custom CSS Class.

CSS Class: fade-cta-title

Make the cta button full width by adding the following custom CSS to the Promo Button CSS input box.

And update the transition duration.

Transition Duration: 800ms

divi change content on hover

Finally, update the background color so that is transparent by default and changes color on hover.

Background Color: none (delete)
Background Color (hover): rgba(247,78,72,0.86)

divi change content on hover

Next, delete the two modules in the row above our Call to Action module so that it replaces the original cta from the layout.

Result So Far

Here is the result so far. Notice how the title text and the button text changes when hovering over the call to action module.

divi change content on hover

Softening the Content Change with Animation

If we want to soften the transition of the big title in the CTA, we can add a simple animation with CSS. Since we already added the CSS Class the module, all we need to do is open the page settings modal and add the following custom CSS:


.fade-cta-title:hover .et_pb_module_header {
  animation-name: fadeinout;
  animation-duration: 800ms;
}

@keyframes fadeinout {
  from {opacity: 0;}
  to {opacity: 1;}
}

divi change content on hover

Final Result

Now let’s check out the final result.

divi change content on hover

And here it is on mobile.

divi change content on hover

Final Thoughts

In this tutorial, we’ve shown 3 examples of how to effectively change content on hover in Divi. The built-in hover options for content really do make this an easy process. And with a few snippets of CSS you can add some unique transitions to set the design apart. Hopefully, this will allow you to boost the calls to action on your own site for more conversions and engagement.

Want more? We have a ton of great posts that will help take your CTA’s to the next level.

I look forward to hearing from you in the comments.

Cheers!

The post How to Change Content on Hover to Create Unique CTAs in Divi (3 Ways) appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/how-to-change-content-on-hover-to-create-3-unique-ctas-in-divi 2317868@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Tue, 03 Sep 2019 16:00:56 GMT
<![CDATA[What Artists Should Know About Songtrust]]> Did you know that each time your song is streamed, it generates a mechanical royalty that is not paid through your distributor? You need a publishing administrator like Songtrust to collect it.

For a $100 setup fee and 15% commission, Songtrust will help you sign up with a PRO (ASCAP, BMI, SOCAN, IMRO, etc) if you’re not already. Next, they’ll register an unlimited number of songs with over 45 collection societies worldwide. If you’ve already got songs registered with your PRO, they’ll pull them into their system for free.

Publishing is complicated. Okay, it’s a total mess. My goal for this article is to share my experience with Songtrust, and help you decide if it’s for you, without getting into the weeds.

Why I signed up

Many years ago, I saw this post on the Songtrust blog, breaking down the various royalties Spotify pays to songwriters. I figured that since I’d earned a few hundred bucks from Spotify via CD Baby, the mechanical royalties Songtrust would collect for me would cover the cost of signing up.

Also, I paid big bucks for radio promotion across France and Italy way back in 2000, putting my songs in regular rotation on over 40 commercial stations. The promoter guessed I’d get back about $1500 in royalties from the airplay, but I never got a penny, despite hounding ASCAP for months. I hoped maybe Songtrust would dig some of that up.

So, in early 2012, I contacted Songtrust and said I’d like to write an article about their service. I was granted a 25% discount off their top tier plan at the time, which was $250 per year for global collection, with no commission. The next year they changed their pricing structure to the current $100 plus 15% commission.

What Songtrust collected

As of August 2019, Songtrust has collected a total of $804 on my behalf.

royalty reporting

I’ve received $789 of that to date, $467 of which is US performance royalties that I would’ve collected through ASCAP anyway.

In fact, since Songtrust takes a 15% commission, that $467 would’ve been $549 directly through ASCAP.

Fortunately, Songtrust more than made up for it by collecting an additional $322 for me that I wouldn’t have otherwise received:

  • $73 in international performance royalties
  • $212 in US mechanical royalties
  • $27 in international mechanical royalties
  • $10 in “other” + print + sync

What about those missing radio royalties from 2000?

I’m out of luck.

It turns out that retroactive mechanicals are hard to uncover. Most societies require them to be claimed within 2-3 years. After that, they are redistributed to their members or blackboxed to cover operational costs.

Is Songtrust right for you?

Obviously it was the right call for me. Even if the numbers didn’t work out in my favor, I’d still be glad I went with Songtrust. Otherwise I’d be wondering if there was a pot of gold waiting for me at the end of the rainbow.

If you’re releasing and actively promoting your music, you need to be registered with a PRO and with SoundExchange. Those two agencies will most likely collect the vast majority of royalties for you.

Should you also join Songtrust? That depends.

If you’re regularly receiving royalties from your PRO as a writer, and don’t want to set up a vanity publishing company, then you should absolutely join Songtrust.

Otherwise you’re potentially leaving 50% of your royalties on the table.

For me, setting up a publishing company was super easy. I just filed a Fictitious Business Name statement. I didn’t even have to set up a checking account to receive checks under the business name, since ASCAP does direct deposit.

If you’ve racked up 150K streams of your music (across all platforms), you should probably join Songtrust.

According to Songtrust, that’s approximately the point at which they collect enough on your behalf to cover the setup fee and commission. In other words, you’ve got nothing to lose!

If you’re already receiving both writer and publisher royalties from your PRO, and have less than 150K streams, the decision is more difficult.

If 10% of your streaming earnings is more than 15% of your publishing royalties, you’ll probably come out ahead with Songtrust. For most of us, that’s difficult if not impossible to forecast.

Beyond the financial uncertainty, there’s also the psychological uncertainty. Are you okay with not knowing how much you could’ve received?

To make your decision easier, readers who sign up with the discount code PASSIVE-ST get 20% off the $100 setup fee.

Other options

CD Baby members are no doubt already familiar with CD Baby Pro, which is powered by Songtrust.

With CD Baby Pro, royalty collection is bundled with digitial distribution. You pay $5 more per single and $40 more per album. They take the same 15% commission.

If you only have a release or two, and have no plans to ever switch distributors, CD Baby Pro might be a better option for you. Personally, I’d rather pay once and be done with it.

TuneCore charges a one-time $75 fee and 15% commission for publishing administration. They’ll even pitch your songs for film, television, and video game opportunities!

There’s a catch though: TuneCore requires that you work with them exclusively for licensing.

And don’t forget, you’re paying $10 per single and $50 per album every year just to keep them in distribution! Who knows if they’ll continue to pitch and collect royalties for songs they no longer distribute.

Have you tried Songtrust, CD Baby Pro, or TuneCore publishing?

If not, what are you waiting for? Are there any other options I overlooked? Please share your experience in the comments!

If you’d like to hear more of my promotional escapades, be sure to subscribe to my How I’m Promoting My Music This Month email newsletter.

Better yet, join me on Patreon for a behind-the-scenes look at my creative process and promotional efforts!

The post What Artists Should Know About Songtrust appeared first on Passive Promotion.

]]>
https://passivepromotion.com/what-artists-should-know-about-songtrust 2316379@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Wed, 28 Aug 2019 15:00:46 GMT
<![CDATA[How to Create a Simple Text Marquee with Divi]]> Text marquees provide a scrolling area of text to your website that engage readers with useful snippets of content.They are also called tickers (or news tickers) and are often used to show a steady stream of news updates at the top or bottom of a page. Usually the scrolling animation is done with a single line of content in a loop so that the information is displayed repeatedly. Unfortunately, the html <marquee> tag is obsolete so we are counting on CSS and JavaScript to create marquees these days. However, with Divi, you can create a simple marquee without having to worry about custom code.

In this tutorial, we will walk you through how easy it is to create a simple text marquee with Divi. We will even cover how to pause the scrolling text animation on hover and how to add a large text marquee as a unique design element for your headers.

Let’s get started.

Sneak Peek

divi text marquee

divi text marquee

divi text marquee

Download the Layout for FREE

To lay your hands on the designs from this tutorial, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber, you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

To import the layout to your page, simply extract the zip file and drag the json file into the Divi Builder.

Let’s get to the tutorial shall we?

What You Need to Get Started

To get started, you will need to have the following:

  1. The Divi Theme installed and active
  2. A new page created to build from scratch on the front end (visual builder)

After that, you will have a blank canvas to start designing in Divi.

Part 1: Creating a Simple Text Marquee in Divi

divi text marquee

For this first example, we are going to create a simple text marquee for a line of text. To do this, we’ll give a row a max width with the overflow hidden. Then we will add a looping slide animation to a text module containing the line of text so that it slides across the row repeatedly coming into view like a marquee.

Here’s how to do it.

First, create a regular section with a one column row.

divi text marquee

Then, before adding a module, update the row with a fixed width, a box shadow and a border radius as follows:

  • Max Width: 200px
  • Padding: 10px top, 10px bottom
  • Round Corners: 10px
  • Box Shadow: see screenshot
  • Horizontal Overflow: Hidden
  • Vertical Overflow: Hidden

divi text marquee

Add the Text Module

Once the row is finished, add a new text module to the row.

divi text marquee

Then update the body content with a single line of text. For now make sure the line of text doesn’t break into another line.

  • Body: “This is a sentence”

Text Module Design

Update the text module design settings as follows:

  • Margin: -100% left, 100% right

This positions the text module outside the left of the row. Because the row has overflow visibility hidden, the module will be hidden until we add animation to bring it into view.

divi text marquee

  • Animation Style: Slide
  • Animation Direction: Right
  • Animation Duration: 5000ms
  • Animation Intensity: 100%
  • Animation Starting Opacity: 100%
  • Animation Speed Curve: Linear
  • Animation Repeat: Loop

divi text marquee

Result

Now let’s check out the result.

divi text marquee

Creating Longer Lines of Text

In the simple text marquee design above, we have limited the width of the line of text to the same width of the row. However, if we want to create a longer line of text with the same row width, we will need to modify the settings a bit.

First, on the text module and replace the body text with the following:

<p>This is a sentence in a marquee with a <a href="#">link</a></p>

divi text marquee

Add More Width and Margin to Accommodate for the Longer Line of Text

As you may notice, the text is now breaking into three lines instead of one.

divi text marquee

Therefore, we need to adjust the margin and animation intensity.

  • Width: 207%
  • Margin: -207% left, 207% right
  • Animation Intensity: 75%

The trick here is to increase the width and update the margin values so that you provide just enough room for the single line of text. Then adjust the animation intensity so that there isn’t a big break in between the looping animation.

Result

Here is the final result.

divi text marquee

Pausing the Marquee Text Animation on Hover

Since this marquee includes a link, it will be difficult for users to actually click the link while it is moving. However, we can add a small snippet of css to the text module that will pause the animation on hover.

Add a CSS Snippet to Pause the Animation on Hover

To add the css snippet, open the text module settings and add the following custom CSS to the main element under the hover tab:


animation-play-state: paused;

divi text marquee

Final Result

Now check out the final result. Notice how the text animation will pause when the cursor hovers over the text, allowing the user to click the link.

divi text marquee

Part 2: Creating a Text Marquee as a Responsive Design Element in Divi

divi text marquee

Now that we understand how to create a simple text marquee in Divi, we can take the same concept to create a responsive text marquee design element. This would work well to create unique animation designs for headers or section headings.

To do this we are going to use Divi’s Job Recruiter Home Page premade layout.

Add the Premade Layout

To add the layout to your page, open the settings menu at the bottom of the Divi builder and click the plus symbol. From the load from library popup, select the job recruiter layout pack. Then click to use the home page layout.

divi text marquee

Delete Extra Content with the Layout

Once the layout has been loaded to the page, deploy the wireframe view mode and delete all the content of the layout except for the fullwidth header and the section directly below it.

divi text marquee

Creating the Text Marquee Animation

As you can see, the word “hired” is already be used as a large text design element in a text module in the second section. We are going to turn that text module into a responsive text marquee design element. The key to make the text marquee responsive is to make sure the row and text module span the full width of the browser window. We can do this using a width of 100%. Then we can use the vw length unit for the text size. This will make the text scale nicely with the browser widths. After that we will apply the same principles that we used to make our simple text marquee example earlier.

Here’s how to do it.

Update the Row Settings

As mentioned before, the row needs to be 100% for this responsive text marquee design to work. This allows our text module to use vw length units which are relative to the width of the browser. Since our premade layout already has a row with 100% width, we don’t have to do anything.

divi text marquee

However, we do need to adjust the rest of the settings as follows.

  • Margin: -24vw bottom
  • Transform Translate Y axis: -24vw
  • Horizontal Overflow: Hidden
  • Vertical Overflow: Hidden

divi text marquee

The negative bottom margin is to get rid of the negative space left over whenever we move the row up using transform translate. And we need to hide the overflow of the row for our text marquee effect.

Update Text Module Text Design

Now all you need to do us update the text module to convert it into a large text marquee design element.

Open the text module and update the following:

  • Text Text Color: rgba(255,255,255,0.16)
  • Text Text Size: 36vw
  • Margin: -100% left, 100% right

The text size is using a vw length unit so the text will scale nicely with the width of the browser.

divi text marquee

Add Animation to the Text Module

  • Animation Style: Slide
  • Animation Direction: Left
  • Animation Duration: 10000ms
  • Animation Intensity: 100%
  • Animation Speed Curve: Linear
  • Animation Repeat: Loop

divi text marquee

Final Design

Now check out the final design.

divi text marquee

Final Thoughts

Text marquees can be a convenient tool to have in web design. They aren’t limited to function strictly as news tickers either. They can also add a nice animation element to your web design. And the best part is that Divi makes it easy to create and design them in all kinds of beautiful ways. I hope this tutorial will help you create some simple text marquees whenever the time comes that you need one.

I look forward to hearing from you in the comments.

Cheers!

The post How to Create a Simple Text Marquee with Divi appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

]]>
https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/how-to-create-a-simple-text-marquee-with-divi 2314445@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Fri, 23 Aug 2019 16:00:31 GMT
<![CDATA[What Every Man Should Know About Having a Heart Attack]]>

heart attack signs and symptoms + cpr and aed use

Editor’s Note: This is a guest article by Marine Corps veteran and paramedic Charles Patterson.

Imagine this scenario: you’re in line at an airport ticket counter getting ready to leave for a well-earned vacation with your wife. The kids are safe and sound with your parents, you made sure the stove was off before you left the house, and you even remembered your toothbrush. Then the man in front of you — who’s been arguing with the ticket agent about the weight of his luggage — suddenly grips his chest, cries out in pain, drops his carry-on, and falls to his hands and knees. His wife screams and frantically starts shouting, “Bill?! Bill! What’s wrong?! Bill!” The man rolls over to a sitting position against the ticket counter and you notice his face has gone pale and he looks scared. While you’re watching, he stops responding to his wife and slumps over.

What just happened? Your wife looks at you with a Do something! expression and indeed you want to do something, but you don’t even know what happened, let alone what to do. You hear somebody yell, “Call 911!” and you fumble for your phone, unsure of what to even say if you do call.

Bill just suffered a heart attack. His years of overeating, infrequent physical activity, refusal to take his blood pressure medicine, and the on and off chest pain he’d been ignoring the last few months culminated in a singular episode that may have just killed him.

The characters and the settings change, and the causes and results vary, but a scene similar to this plays out in people’s hearts many times a day, every single day, all over the world.

Every year in America nearly 800,000 people have a heart attack — and the majority of them are men. Heart attacks most commonly occur in patients with some form of heart disease. Heart disease (a term encompassing several conditions) is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, with more than 600,000 deaths per year, and most of these are a result of heart attacks and strokes.

With statistics like these, it is very likely that you or someone you know has been or will be affected by a heart attack. A heart attack may result in sudden cardiac arrest, where the heart stops beating, but most heart attacks are survivable. The good news is that with a little education you can recognize the signs, symptoms, and risk factors of a heart attack, as well as what to do if you, or someone around you, has one.

The Physiology of a Heart Attack

While there are a few ways that a heart attack can occur, the majority happen as a result of a clot formation in the coronary arteries. Heart attack patients typically have some form of coronary artery disease, commonly atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of plaque along the walls of the coronary arteries. These plaque deposits can rupture or break off under high pressure. When they do rupture, the blood is exposed to the plaque’s necrotic core, which causes a clot formation. As this clot grows and blocks the vessel, blood flow to the rest of the heart is reduced and can eventually stop. As a result, oxygen cannot get to the rest of the heart and the tissue begins to die.

Tissue that is becoming starved for oxygen is called ischemic tissue. In the heart, this is called cardiac ischemia. If the tissue goes too long without oxygen, it becomes permanently damaged and is said to be infarcted. This permanent tissue death of the heart muscle is a myocardial infarction — which literally means “death of heart muscle.”

When part of the heart muscle becomes damaged or dies, the heart’s ability to pump blood is reduced. Imagine suffering a permanent injury to your arm that prevents you from doing as many bicep curls as you could before. How badly the heart muscle is damaged depends on a variety of factors, including where the clot formed in the coronary arteries and how long the patient goes without treatment.

While many heart attacks are not fatal, the damage that they cause has lasting effects that may directly lead to further heart problems or may increase the risk of future heart attacks and other conditions.

A heart attack may result in:

  • Congestive heart failure (a progressive condition where the heart no longer pumps efficiently)
  • Irregular, sometimes fatal, heart rhythms
  • Increased risk of stroke
  • More heart attacks

Heart attacks that are fatal cause enough damage to the heart that it stops beating. This is known as sudden cardiac arrest. The vast majority of people who go into sudden cardiac arrest — upwards of 90% — unfortunately do not survive. If caught quickly, though, a heart can sometimes be shocked back to a normal rhythm. The chance of this is very low, however, and with the small percentage who do survive, many of them are not able to return to a normal life.

Risk Factors for a Heart Attack

While it is certainly possible for anyone of any age to have a heart attack due to congenital heart defects, drug use, or other causes, there are certain factors that increase the risk of a heart attack. Most are caused by underlying heart disease; therefore, the risk factors for a heart attack are mostly the same as for heart disease.

Some of these factors we can control, either through lifestyle changes or through medicine prescribed by a physician. These include:

  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • High cholesterol
  • Poor diet
  • Obesity
  • Stress
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Smoking
  • Illicit drug use
  • Uncontrolled diabetes

With these factors, lowering your risk of having a heart attack can be as simple (I said simple, not easy!) as eating healthy and exercising regularly. Talk to your doctor about medications and lifestyle changes that can be used to reduce these risks. In the case of uncontrolled diabetes, remaining compliant with your insulin or medications, maintaining a healthy diet, and seeing your doctor at regular intervals can decrease the risk of commonly related conditions.

Some risk factors that can’t be controlled include:

  • Sex: heart attacks are most common in men.
  • Age: the older we get, the more at risk we are for developing coronary artery disease and thus having heart attacks. The risk of heart attacks in men increases after age 45 (55 for women), and the average age for a first-time heart attack is 66 (age 70 for women).
  • Family history: people with a family history of heart disease and heart attacks are more likely to develop the same conditions. This can be genetic, but it can also be common environmental factors or learned behaviors such as alcoholism, poor diet, drug use, or higher stress levels.
  • Race: certain ethnicities have shown higher prevalence and incidence of heart disease, its risk factors, or associated diseases than others, including African-Americans, Native Americans/Alaskan Natives.

Some medical conditions can also lead to increased risk of heart disease, including thyroid and adrenal gland disorders. It is important to talk to your doctor to learn more about your individual risk factors, underlying medical conditions, and what you can do to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

To read more about risk factors and steps you can take, visit this page from the American Heart Association.

What Does a Heart Attack Look/Feel Like?

While there are a variety of common signs and symptoms, the classic symptom of a heart attack is chest pain. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 70% of heart attack patients experience chest pain (you likely thought it would be 100%!). This pain is usually felt in the center or left side of the chest and may or may not radiate to the left arm, neck, jaw, or the back between the shoulder blades. Chest pain is also often described as pressure, tightness, heaviness, or “like someone is sitting on my chest.”

Other common symptoms include:

  • Sudden and profuse sweating
  • Cool, clammy skin
  • Appearing pale
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Acid reflux
  • Upper middle (“epigastric”) abdominal pain
  • Nausea (with or without vomiting)
  • Syncope (fainting or passing out)
  • Lightheadedness or feeling weak or faint
  • Feelings of anxiety, irritability, or restlessness
  • An impending sense of doom

Though chest pain is the hallmark sign of a heart attack, many people will not experience pain at all. Women, diabetics, people with neuropathy, and the elderly are especially likely to experience what’s known as a “silent” heart attack that presents without chest pain.

The difficulty with a silent heart attack is that the symptoms you may feel could also be symptoms of other illnesses or may be so vague that you don’t feel the need to seek help. While you may explain your acid reflux and upper abdominal pain as “probably my dinner disagreeing with me,” never be afraid to seek help if something doesn’t feel right.

Men in particular tend to put things off or ignore health issues. We like to shrug it off, ignore it until it goes away, or make excuses and denials for our symptoms. Don’t wait, and don’t be stubborn. It’s important to act fast; you need to get to a hospital in about 60 minutes or less to minimize accruing permanent, irreversible damage to your heart. As we like to say, “time is life” or “time is muscle.” 

Is It a Heart Attack? Or Something Else?

It’s worth noting that some of the symptoms listed above may also be signs of other medical conditions. In the right combinations, these symptoms can suggest shock from other causes, pulmonary embolisms (a clot in the blood vessels of your lungs), aortic aneurysms (the ballooning of part of the aorta in either the chest cavity or abdomen), irregular heart rhythms, certain thyroid conditions, and many more. If you’re not sure if what you’re experiencing is a heart attack, get help. Heart attack or not, these are all serious conditions that may be fatal without medical care.

One condition in particular that can result in symptoms that feel like a heart attack is a coronary artery that is partially blocked due to plaque buildup. Due to this partial blockage, the heart is not able to get enough oxygen and you may feel chest pain or other symptoms. This is called angina. Angina often occurs with physical exertion or stress — when the heart’s demand for oxygen increases — but it may also occur while at rest. The pain or symptoms may or may not go away with time and rest. Angina is not a heart attack, but it is a sign of underlying heart disease and a warning sign of a heart attack.

In the same way that a broken bone cannot be diagnosed without an x-ray, the difference between angina and a heart attack cannot be determined without evaluation and testing by a doctor. If you’re having chest pain or any of the other above symptoms, never assume it’s “just” angina. Again, err on the side of safety and get help.

What to Do in the Event of a Heart Attack

If you believe you or someone you know is having a heart attack, it is important to act quickly while remaining calm. A knowledgeable bystander who recognizes when someone may be having a heart attack is the first and most important step in what the American Heart Association refers to as the “Chain of Survival.” Without the bystander or the patient recognizing the symptoms and deciding to act, the other links in the chain of survival cannot be put into action.

  • Before you do anything else, CALL 911 (or your local emergency number). Be sure to provide the dispatcher with your location, describing where the patient is as best as you can to guide EMS when they arrive. If you’re in a large building such as a store, warehouse, or office building, consider sending another person (if available) as a guide to wait for EMS. The dispatcher will ask you for other information about the patient and their condition. Stay with the patient and remain calm while providing this information and stay on the line until EMS arrives.
  • Place the patient in a position of comfort. While it is widely understood that the best position for someone in shock or with shock-like symptoms is lying on their back with their feet elevated, a person having a heart attack may be having a hard time breathing and could have fluid in their lungs (a condition known as pulmonary edema) which makes breathing difficult. Sitting upright may relieve this to some degree. Place the patient in whichever position is most comfortable for them.
  • Give aspirin, if available. If the patient is awake and conscious enough to follow directions and swallow safely, give them aspirin. The typical recommendation is 162-325 mg (2-4 baby aspirin, or 1 full strength), chewed and swallowed. Chewing before swallowing increases the rate of absorption and will allow the drug to act faster. Aspirin is often referred to as a blood thinner, but it is technically an anti-platelet medication. Aspirin causes platelets in the blood to become less adherent to each other and thus prevents clotting. Make sure the patient isn’t allergic to aspirin before giving it! (For situations like this, it can be a good idea to keep some aspirin in your own first aid kit!)

These initial steps can have a significant impact on the survivability of a heart attack. If you take away nothing else, the most important step is to call 911 immediately to activate emergency services.

If the patient becomes unresponsive, they may have gone into cardiac arrest. Don’t assume they have and try to start CPR; they may have just fainted or become unconscious. First:

  • Check for responsiveness by shaking the patient at the shoulder and addressing them: “Hey buddy, are you okay? Can you hear me?” If you know their name, address them by name.
  • If they remain unresponsive, lay the patient flat on the floor and feel for a carotid pulse (that’s the one at the neck).
  • “Look, listen, and feel” for evidence of breathing. Place your face above the patient’s mouth and look towards the chest. Look for the rise and fall of the chest, listen for breath sounds from the patient’s nose and mouth, and feel for their breath on your face while you feel for their pulse.
  • If you can feel a pulse and they appear to be breathing normally, do not initiate CPR; just continue to monitor their heart rate and breathing until EMS arrives.

If you cannot feel a pulse and the patient has stopped breathing, they have gone into cardiac arrest. The best chance for this patient now is to start CPR and give a shock from an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). The emergency dispatcher may guide you through steps to begin what is known as “hands-only” CPR and using an AED if one is available. An AED provides easy-to-follow audio or video instructions to safely and effectively deliver a shock. If a patient goes into cardiac arrest, starting CPR and giving a shock with an AED as soon as possible can mean the difference between life and death. We’ll explore this more next.

CPR and AEDs

Performing CPR

If you’ve never experienced it firsthand, CPR in real life is very different than what is sometimes portrayed in movies and television. In movies we often see someone giving a few soft pats or gentle presses on the patient’s chest (or in the really bad examples, on their stomach) or a single grandiose thump of the chest and the patient returning to full consciousness suddenly and dramatically with a huge gasp and a “Whoa, what happened?!” CPR in real life does not work this way and does not return the patient miraculously to life.

CPR is performed to prolong life until advanced care is received. The compressions performed in CPR manually force the heart to pump blood to the body, providing oxygen to the brain and other vital organs, until the heart can be jumpstarted with an electric shock from an AED or by EMS or hospital staff with advanced heart monitors and drugs such as adrenaline (epinephrine). Even if these devices and drugs return the heart to a normal rhythm, the patient may not return to consciousness immediately or at all. Unfortunately, the large majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests are ultimately fatal. By giving high-quality CPR and early shock from an AED, however, we give a cardiac arrest patient the best chance of life.

If you are with someone who has gone into cardiac arrest, you may be directed by the emergency dispatcher to perform CPR before the EMTs or paramedics arrive. For bystanders, the common advice now is to perform “hands-only CPR”; unlike traditional CPR, hands-only CPR does not involve “mouth-to-mouth” or other means of breathing for the patient, but chest compressions only. 

I recommend everyone seek CPR (and AED) training. Having hands-on training to help you understand the mechanics of CPR and feeling the appropriate rate and depth of compressions is extremely beneficial and cannot be matched by simply watching a video or reading instructions online. Being able to go through the steps of CPR on a dummy will help you build confidence and remain calm in the event of an emergency.how to perform hands only cpr

That being said, for informative purposes only, hands-only CPR for an adult is basically performed as follows:

  • Kneel down at the side of the patient.
  • Place the heel of your palm (of your dominant hand) in the center of the patient’s sternum. Interlock the other hand on top of the first.
  • With your arms fully extended and leaning forward so your shoulders are above your hands, begin compressing the chest with your body weight. Do not compress with your arm strength by bending your arms.
  • Compress the chest to a depth of at least two inches and at a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute. I was taught to sing the refrain from “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees while doing CPR to get an idea of the appropriate rate (although, in the middle of an actual CPR event, I’ve never had the Bee Gees pop into my head or felt much like singing).

Many attempts at CPR by untrained persons ultimately fail because the depth and rate of compressions are not sufficient. People worry about pushing the chest too hard because they don’t want to hurt the patient. At the risk of sounding harsh, if you’re performing CPR the patient is already basically dead; you are not going to hurt them by compressing fully.

Once you begin hands-only CPR, don’t stop! Keep compressing the chest until EMS arrives. Consider trading off compressions every couple of minutes with another bystander so you can continue to provide effective compressions; proper CPR will wear you out, and as you grow tired your compressions can become slower and shallower. Stick with it! If you do have to stop, limit breaks to 10 seconds or less.

Administering an AED

Remember: CPR is performed to prolong life until a shock from an AED or by EMS is given. As soon as an AED is available, use it.

Many public buildings and workplaces have AEDs available in the event of an emergency. Every state has some law or regulation regarding AEDs, and some states require them in certain locations, such as health and fitness centers. You may have seen signs at public locations with “AED HERE” or similar to alert the public to the location of these devices. They may also be accompanied by kits that include trauma shears to remove clothing for the placement of AED pads, protective barrier devices to give mouth-to-mouth respirations during CPR, and sometimes even a razor to shave the chest (if there is excessive hair, which prevents the pads from sticking properly). Check with your workplace if an AED is available in an emergency and keep an eye out for them while you’re running errands.

Despite the many manufacturers and models of AEDs, using one is almost universally the same:

  • First, turn the AED on. The device will begin providing instructions with audible or video-guided cues. The specific instructions do vary slightly between models, so follow the prompts.
  • Apply the pads to the patient’s bare chest. Yes, this means bare for women, too. If the patient is sweaty or wet, dry the chest off before applying the pads. The pads are typically kept in a package that has an image showing where each pad goes. One pad will be placed on the chest to the right (the patient’s right!) of the sternum and below the collar bone. The second will be placed under the left pec/breast. If you have another bystander with you, apply the pads while they’re performing CPR. Don’t stop until the device instructs you to.
  • The AED will direct you to stop CPR if it is being performed and to not touch the patient while it analyzes the electrical rhythm of the patient’s heart. If a shockable rhythm is detected, the AED will say something along the lines of “shock advised” and will begin charging.
  • Repeating again to stay clear of the patient (humans are great conductors of electricity) the AED will instruct you to deliver a shock by pressing a button on the device.
  • Making absolutely certain that no one is touching the patient, deliver the shock. Be aware of things such as metal around the patient or puddles of water that may conduct the electricity to you even if you’re not in contact with the patient directly.
  • Once you’ve delivered the shock, the AED will instruct you to continue CPR. After two minutes of CPR, the AED will repeat the steps of analysis, charging, and delivering a shock with the continued audible and/or visual instructions. This will continue in cycles of CPR and shocks until EMS arrives.

A quick search on YouTube turns up several videos from the American Heart Association and American Red Cross that demonstrate these steps for reference, but just as with getting hands-on training in doing CPR, nothing replaces real world  practice in how to use an AED. You may never be put in a situation to use these skills, but if you are, you’ll be glad to have the training.

The American Heart Association has many training options for everyone from professional responders to everyday people, including options for certification if required for a job. Some of these training options include full First Aid, CPR, and AED training, but you can also find training just for the hands-only CPR we’ve discussed. The American Red Cross offers similar training options. Both of these organizations offer online, in-person, or combination courses and additional training materials to suit your needs.

What to Expect From EMS and at the Hospital

So far, we’ve discussed how heart attacks are caused, how you can reduce your risk of having one, and what to look for and what to do if you witness someone having a heart attack. What a lot of folks aren’t familiar with is what to expect once you’re in the ambulance or at the hospital. During these high-stress and emotionally charged situations it is easy for things to seem quite chaotic. It may help you to have a better understanding of what is happening.

Depending on where you live and the resources available, you may have 2-6 EMS responders arrive. Some areas have limited EMS resources and you may only have two EMTs arrive. Other areas have fire departments that respond with an ambulance and a fire engine carrying up to 6 paramedics. Regardless, every member of these teams has a specific role to play during a heart attack. These roles and procedures performed may vary slightly based on responder certification and whether the patient is still conscious or not. The steps I mention are very similar in both a paramedic-staffed ambulance and an emergency department. Depending on the individual situation, most of these steps are performed concurrently.

While the following procedures are happening, one of the responders will also be talking to the patient, asking about their symptoms, medical history, prescription medications, and other information. If the patient is unconscious, they’ll attempt to gain the same information from a family member or bystander.

Initially, vital signs are gathered including blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen percentage, and a 12-lead EKG is performed. An EKG involves placing a bunch of stickers (electrodes) connected to wires on the patient’s chest, arms, and legs. These wires are connected to an advanced heart monitor that can read the electrical signal from the heart and give 12 different views (leads) of that signal. The 12-lead can show signs of a heart attack and which part of the heart is being affected. (A 12-lead can also detect irregular heart rhythms and a wide assortment of conditions other than a heart attack, so they are widely used in EMS and hospital settings for more than just suspicion of a heart attack.)

If the patient is in cardiac arrest when EMS arrives, they will take over CPR and connect the patient to their heart monitor, which has an advanced version of an AED. They will continue the cycle of CPR and delivering shocks on the way to the hospital while adding the other steps mentioned below.

If the patient is still conscious, they may be given extra oxygen either through a nasal cannula (the small tube you see under the nose that wraps around the ears) or a non-rebreather (a mask that covers the nose and mouth with a bag attached to the bottom) depending on how much extra oxygen the patient needs.

The patient may be given aspirin if it hasn’t already been given, as well as another drug called nitroglycerin. Often referred to simply as “nitro,” nitroglycerin helps to dilate blood vessels, and can open up the affected coronary arteries and allow more blood flow past the blockage. Nitroglycerin may or may not be used depending on the patient’s vital signs. Patients can be prescribed nitro for certain heart conditions and although the patient may take this as directed, avoid giving it to them yourself. Nitro can be helpful, but in the right situations it can actually make matters worse. EMS and hospital staff are trained to recognize these situations.

They will start at least one, but often two IVs (intravenous access). Placing an IV allows responders to give medication, such as morphine, directly into the blood. Morphine can quickly relieve pain; relieving pain can reduce the patient’s stress and the workload of the heart. Fluids may also be given to increase blood pressure if it is too low. If the patient is in cardiac arrest, other drugs such as adrenaline will be given through the IV in an effort to chemically kickstart the heart (Motley Crüe, anyone?).

Some EMS agencies and hospitals will instead start what’s called an “IO” if the patient is in cardiac arrest. An IO, or intraosseous access, is a needle placed into a bone, allowing medications or fluids to enter the blood through the bone marrow. This works nearly as fast as an IV (the difference is mostly imperceptible) and can be faster and easier to start when the heart is not pumping blood. An IO is started with a small handheld drill which can seem rather vicious to family members watching, but this is a fast process and it helps to remember that the unconscious patient cannot feel it.

Initially, artificial breathing for the patient will be done by a bag about the shape and size of a football that is connected to a face mask and squeezed to deliver air. This method of breathing is not perfect, though, and some of the air inevitably leaks outside the mask or makes its way to the stomach instead of the lungs. Different EMS agencies have different rules, but if allowed, paramedics will perform a procedure called endotracheal intubation.

Endotracheal intubation means that a small tube will be placed directly into the trachea, allowing all the air that is delivered from the bag to go straight to the lungs. It can be a frightening thing for family members or bystanders to witness, but it is more effective for delivering much-needed oxygen. It is also ultimately safer for the patient, as it keeps the airway open and prevents vomit, blood (if present), or other secretions from getting into the airway. It effectively seals off the lungs from anything other than oxygen-rich air.

Once the patient is at the hospital and stabilized, blood tests will be performed to look for certain enzymes and hormones released by the heart during a heart attack. The patient will be sent to the cardiac catheterization lab (or “cath lab” for short) where a doctor, guided by advanced imaging, can perform a variety of minimally invasive procedures to increase blood flow to the coronary arteries and place stents or balloons to keep these vessels open. Afterward they’ll be transferred to the ICU. Not all patients require a visit to the cath lab; some may need more drastic procedures and some may just be taken straight to the ICU. There are too many variables and too many resulting possibilities to list here.

You must also prepare yourself for the possibility that, despite all efforts, the patient may not leave the emergency room. While not all heart attacks are fatal, many are, and ultimately, most people who go into cardiac arrest cannot be resuscitated and will die.

This is not an eventuality that any of us want to face. But armed with a little knowledge and advice from your doctor, you can take steps to reduce your own risk of heart disease and heart attacks, and encourage those you love to do the same. Don’t put it off. Make an appointment with your doctor and sign up for a CPR class. By knowing what to look for, keeping your cool, and taking a few simple actions, you can make a difference and maybe even save the life of someone you love.

_____________________________________

Charles Patterson is a husband to a beautiful wife and father of five wonderful children. After serving as a linguist in the Marine Corps and earning a degree in Music Production after discharge, Charles found his true passion as a paramedic. When the work is done and the chores are finished, he enjoys cycling, mountain biking, shooting guns, frisbee golf with his family, and playing guitar.

The post What Every Man Should Know About Having a Heart Attack appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

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<![CDATA[How Not to Be Boring and Still Be Professional]]> Today’s professional isn’t the stuffy, buttoned-up, yawn of a person from the past. For the sake of stereotype-breaking, let’s talk about a different, more modern type of professional. He or she engages employees, clients and colleagues instead of making them check their watch. The ability to catch and keep someone’s attention is important at work as well as in non-work settings. If you’re putting yourself out there as a professional, you should be aware of the vibe you give off.

Become a Good Conversationalist

There are plenty of times in your professional life when you’ll have to make non-work conversation. Team building exercises, work mixers, waiting for the coffee to brew and the start of a business call are opportunities to connect on a personal level. But you still have to exercise a certain amount of professionalism.

If you’re stumped about to what to say once you’re done commenting on the weather, you need a crash course in making interesting conversation. A common question to ask or be asked is, “So, what’s new?” Most of the time, it’s answered with a quick, “Ah, nothing much, you know, same old same old, working hard.”

It’s not that you’re boring, it’s that your recall is poor. You watched a mind-blowing documentary last night and listened to a hilarious podcast this morning. The problem is that you don’t remember either of those things. You were put on the spot and you froze.

On top of being interesting, the topics you discuss have to be appropriate. Unless you work in politics, your feelings about the current president are not appropriate to discuss at work, no matter which way you lean. Even if you develop a casual rapport with your colleagues or clients, you still have to represent the brand at all times.

Choose the Right Topics to Talk About

To kick the stereotype of the boring professional to the curb, what you talk about has to be interesting. Obvious, right? The thing that most people forget is that normal, daily life can be intriguing if it’s framed well. The fact that you got your car washed is not interesting. But if you took your car to a brand new car wash that also serves old school milkshakes, that’s interesting.

Here are three ways to be inquisitive that go beyond, “So, what’s up?” and inspire a conversation that matters. You can also silently ask yourself these questions to come up with talking points:

  • What’s been the highlight of your week so far?
  • Tell me about your passion projects.
  • What are you reading, listening to, watching…?

Everyone has everyday, ordinary stuff going on. If you can share that in a way that’s engaging, you have the chance to be relatable and connect with someone else. By assuming everything in your life is uninteresting, you become uninteresting.

Be Curious in Your Daily Life

Children ask questions you’d never think to ask because they’re looking at things you never notice. They do that by being absorbed in and engaged by what’s happening in front of them. You can do this, too. Don’t wait for something great or weird to happen one day. Ask yourself the questions that will lead to discoveries and, therefore, talking points:

  • What’s that building with the cool architecture/monument/historical site right down the road from the office?
  • What local attractions have I checked out or could I check out?
  • I noticed that that guy does the same thing I do. Why do people do that?

Let yourself chase those little, hopping rabbits of curiosity. When you expand your curiosity, knowledge and life experience, you can jump into any conversation, no matter the topic. You’ll have something to add, even if your experience isn’t in-depth.

When it comes to the topics that you do have a lot of knowledge about, you may find someone who’s as interested as you. Have you ever talked about a true crime story with another true crime head? Or compared craft beer with a craft beer lover? Few conversations are that much fun. They’re relationship-building, even.

Some professionals become boring because their life is so routine. Inject thought-provoking activities into the things you already do. If you read the news every morning, pick articles on topics you usually ignore. Choose a new podcast to listen to on your way to work or try a different cuisine at lunchtime. Break out of your comfort zone even if you can’t break your routine.

Give and Take

Being a professional is especially hard to navigate when you’re in a leadership position. You have to be authoritative, but you don’t want to be overpowering or dismissive. Keep conversations balanced – contribute and then let the other person contribute as well. Talk, then listen.

This makes the other person feel important. When you make other people feel good about themselves, you become more appealing to them. When you ask a question and the other person responds, push it further. Ask “how” and “why” questions to encourage them to talk about themselves more. This works in all sorts of professional settings, whether it’s an after-hours get-together or a meeting with a client.

Pick up on how others are responding, too. Today’s professional doesn’t think, “Well, they’ll have to deal, because this is how I do my job.” They care about what others think of them, especially when it comes to their team members. Pay attention to nonverbal cues that the other person is getting bored or agitated, then take some time to think about a better way to reach them. Everyone has their own communication preferences and styles, and both of you will benefit if you’re adaptable.

Speak Enthusiastically About What Interests You

Doing wild stuff is great and it can lead to exciting conversations. The excitement comes from the delivery, though, not the experience itself. Imagine talking to someone who climbed Mount Everest and they shrug their shoulders and go, “Yeah, I climbed it,” then they stare at you. The topic immediately becomes less interesting than you’d expect.

Being less boring is partially about what you have to talk about, but it’s also about the presentation. When you’re excited about what you’re talking about, the other person will become passionate too, and then that level of energy keeps both of you engaged.

Don’t Try Too Hard

Humor is an excellent skill for a professional to have, but if you try too hard, your desperation will shine through and ruin it. Some people are inherently funny. Others have to force it, and even if they come out with the same line a naturally funny person says, it’s so obviously contrived that it doesn’t land the same way. Instead, be yourself and pay attention to when people react to what you say or do with a laugh or smile. When you can narrow down what’s most amusing about yourself, you can then do that thing more, which will be a natural extension of who you already are.

Wrapping Up

Being a boring professional can get in the way of deals, sales and work events. The key to being interesting is to be interested – there are little treasures to uncover in everyday life. Ordinary things are not boring things.

If you can book a life-changing trip, you’ll definitely have something exciting to discuss. You can also be an everyday adventurer, though, a questioner, discoverer and explorer when you’re home. Curious people are observational and questioning. They wonder out loud, which sparks that same curiosity in others.

Variety in life leads to variety in conversation, new ways to relate to others and creative thinking that gets people excited about work. By being more colorful, you’ll also become more likable and memorable – and a person people want to work for and with.

Make your Twitter bio a little less boring with help from this article: How Having a Cool Bio for Twitter Can Help You Land More Clients.

Featured Image via Nadia Snopek / shutterstock.com

The post How Not to Be Boring and Still Be Professional appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

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<![CDATA[5 Rookie Mistakes Nearly Every Budding Professional Makes (And How to Avoid Them)]]> We’ve all made a rookie mistake at work that still makes us cringe. Sent a department-wide email with a typo that entirely changes the context. Spilled coffee on a crisp white shirt right before an important meeting. Mumbled something incoherent when greeting an important client.

Work anxiety and mistakes come from the desire to impress. That doesn’t make you awkward; it makes you human. Most of the time, the other person isn’t thinking, “What a loser!” Instead, they’re thinking, “Whew, other people do that too!”

What if your mistake was more serious, though? Your boss overheard you gossiping about her with another employee. You spoke publicly about private problems the company is having. You lost your biggest client.

Nobody is immune to rookie mistakes, big or small. You’ll make them at the beginning of your career, and you’ll make them years later when switching jobs or learning new skills. Prevent them from happening, then learn what to do when they happen anyway.

5 Rookie Mistakes You’ll Almost Definitely Make

You’re going to misstep at some point, and it’s possible that you’ll make one of the blunders on this list. The good news? These errors are so common because a bunch of other people have made them, too.

Rookie Mistake #1: Asking Too Many Questions

When you’re starting a new job, everything is novel. Nothing will be familiar and everything will feel alien and confusing. You could spend all day asking questions. The person training you has been there for a long time. They don’t remember how much of their knowledge was unfamiliar at the beginning. They won’t explain everything in as much detail as you need.

Instead of asking question after question, which can impede your training, keep a notepad with a running list of questions. Many of them will be answered as you continue learning. Group the remaining questions by topic and ask them when you sit down with your trainer or boss at the end of the day.

Over-asking makes you seem like you can’t figure anything out on your own. You’ll need clarification on many aspects of the job, but you should show that you’re resourceful enough to figure some stuff out for yourself.

Don’t stay in the dark about questions you need or want the answers to, though. Once you’ve exhausted other possibilities, go ahead and ask. Direct your question at the appropriate person. Your co-worker who’s giving you a tour of the office isn’t the person to grill about the company’s vacation policy.

Rookie Mistake #2: Knowing It All

When you’re starting a new job, even if you’re in a new department at your current workplace, remember that you’re on their turf. Tread lightly at first. Even if you’re in a leadership role, nobody likes the newcomer who sweeps in, shakes everything up, announces that the current processes are dumb or inefficient, and then changes every single thing.

You don’t know everything there is to know about this specific company, team of workers or new role you’re in. Err on the side of humility; slowly make suggestions and changes. Don’t go so far the other way that you play dumb, though. You were hired for a reason and you bring something special to the role. Don’t scream your expertise from the rooftop, but if you’re asked for your suggestions, then by all means, offer them.

Rookie Mistake #3: Over-Explaining Everything You Do

To show how good you are at your new job and that your boss made an excellent decision by hiring you, it’s tempting to mention every move you make. Unless you have a helicopter boss, though, most managers hire people they trust so that they don’t have to micro-manage. It’s fine to share results, but you don’t have to showcase every step that got you there (unless you’re asked to).

While you’re being a self-sufficient worker, don’t keep so much private that you become secretive and unhelpful. You’ll prevent the team from getting the completed, up-to-date info they need. You don’t want to seem shady or difficult to collaborate with. Communication and trust are two of the most important soft skills you can show at a new job.

If you’re unsure of which way to lean, ask. “What type of communication style do you prefer? How often do you want to know about XYZ? At what stage should I update you on this project?” If you’re still unclear, ask more detailed questions. “Should I CC you on all communication with [department]? Do you want a daily or weekly update meeting? Should I send a summary email every Friday afternoon?”

This could be novel to your employer. If you’re working at a startup, your boss may not have thought of this before. If your co-workers aren’t as responsible as you, they may have never asked these questions. It’s possible this will be trial-and-error at first until you and your supervisor find a communication method that fits.

Rookie Mistake #4: Answering “Yes” or “No” Before Thinking

It’s always better to under-promise and over-deliver. If you say “yes” to everything, you could paint yourself into a corner. “Yes, I can have that website finished by the end of the week,” can lead to working late into the night, feeling exhausted and handing in subpar work. Be honest about how much time you need to complete a task and where your skills and strengths are. It’s better to say you need more time and deliver early than to miss an important deadline.

Stopping yourself before you say “yes” is necessary if you’re asked to do something outside the scope of your job description, too. You may have to set boundaries so you can deliver the type of work you want to be known for. Don’t make promises you can’t keep or that are unreasonable.

You could have the other problem, though – saying “no” to everything. Naysayers always find a problem with the project in front of them, a reason they can’t do it or someone else to blame for poor performance. Know the difference between saying “no” to a task you’re unqualified or not responsible for and accepting a challenging project that will stretch you.

Evaluate your skills and your workload. If something needs to change to fit the work you’re given, talk about it with your boss. Reprioritize projects or get extra training before you can jump in. Revisit what you were hired to do, what’s expected of you and your pay rate and title.

Rookie Mistake #5: Oversharing Personal Information

The last thing you want to do at a new job is be standoffish and alienate your co-workers, but sharing too much information too soon can put people off. Steer clear of very personal topics, like your impending divorce or the argument you got into with your mother. Religion and politics should be off the table, too. Also, don’t bad-mouth anybody, whether they work with you or not, and definitely don’t gossip about others in the office.

Treat your new job like your first few dates with someone new. Be open and charming without uncovering too much about yourself. You don’t know yet if you like the people you work with, and you could end up kicking yourself for revealing personal information. Instead, discuss non-work topics like books or movies, your latest fitness excursion or where you’ve traveled.

No Matter What You Did Wrong, Here’s How to Fix It

You blew it. You messed up and now you’re paying for it. Life isn’t over, and your job probably isn’t, either. Whatever you did, here’s what to do next.

Feel terrible

What’s worse than screwing up is screwing up and not even realizing it. If you didn’t feel embarrassed, frustrated or worried, how would you know you messed up in the first place?

Let yourself wallow a little. You messed up and you deserve to suffer from it…for a short period of time. Like, 15 seconds. Maybe a minute. The punishment should fit the crime, and saying something dumb doesn’t require more than 30 seconds of guilt.

If you can’t seem to get over it and the emotions are stuck there, tormenting you, then hit a release valve. Tell someone else about the terrible thing you did. Go to the gym and work it out on a punching bag. Write it all out in your journal.

Put it in perspective

It’s hard to see the reality of a situation when you’re upset with yourself, but you have to come back to earth if you’re going to fix the problem. For most of us, an error at work is not life-or-death. Even in industries that rely on timeliness and accuracy, like the news, making a rookie mistake may get you in trouble with your boss, but nobody’s dying over it. Take your job seriously and approach it with the intent to be accurate and produce high-quality work. But when that doesn’t happen, remember that in the grand scheme of things, it’s not that bad.

Think about the worst-case scenario

Every mistake has consequences, and sometimes those consequences are pretty bad, like if you get fired over your mistake. Consequences are generally grounded in reality, though, and you have to face that reality and make peace with it. If you royally messed up, the consequences are bad enough on their own. You’re not doing yourself any favors by exaggerating or distorting them. You’ll cause more pain and stress, which leads to even more errors. To limit how much messing up you do, look the situation in the face and get real about what the consequences are and are not.

Fill in the blanks: I messed up by [mistake]. The worst-case scenario is [biggest, baddest consequence]. That probably won’t happen because [reason]. If it does happen, though, I will be fine. My next steps will be [action] and then [action]. And whether or not the worst thing happens, I won’t make this mistake again because [reason]. I will prevent this from happening by [action].

You’ve taken control of your faux pas and created a game plan for whatever should happen. Bravo.

Apologize

A lot of the time, the rookie mistakes we make are only mistakes to us. Saying something a little dumb during one of your first meetings with your boss makes you feel embarrassed, but he may have not even noticed. These sort of things don’t require an apology. What would you even say? “Sorry that I sort of put my foot in my mouth?” Join the club.

If your mistake is something you have to apologize for, do it clearly and briefly. “Hi [Name], I realize I made a mistake by [mistake], I’m working to fix it and it won’t happen again.” You don’t have to wrap an apology in five other sentences that sound like you’re begging for forgiveness. Be a person your supervisor and co-workers respect by facing the music and moving on from it.

Prevent it from happening again

Figure out what has to happen to avoid the same mistake in the future. Do you have to slow down when talking and think for a few extra seconds before spurting something out? Do you have to give yourself more time to work on projects so you’re not rushing through them? Here are a few other possibilities:

  • Stop multitasking so much
  • Take a break from email during the day so you can work without distraction
  • Disconnect from toxic co-workers
  • Set more realistic deadlines
  • Take customer service training
  • Rewrite your emails before hitting “send” so they don’t sound as harsh

Here’s a big one: take better care of yourself. If your health is impacting your ability to do your work well, prioritize your wellbeing. Sleep more, stay hydrated, exercise and eat a healthy diet to clear the fog from your brain and prevent errors.

Whatever the issue is, find a way to start fixing it. If it’s appropriate, talk to your supervisor or team member about what you plan to do – but only if it will benefit them to know. “Hey John, I’ve decided I’m not going to chime in so fast during meetings because I always feel like I sound awkward and can’t get my thoughts out clearly.” That’s a personal goal of yours and not something you should share. “Hey John, I’m going to set my deadlines 10 days out instead of 7 because I’d like more time to finalize projects and reduce revisions.” That’s something your team or boss should know.

Give it time

If you’ve done something that requires trust to be rebuilt, it won’t happen overnight. People care about actions. Stop messing up, deliver great work and be patient. There is rarely a mistake that will completely derail your job or your career. Make the changes required, whether they’re small or worthy of a Rocky montage. Forgive yourself and start working on the type of work-life you want to have – one that’s free of rookie mistakes and harmful self-criticism.

Moving Forward

So you messed up. We all have. Wherever you are on the scale from slightly embarrassed to up at night worrying you’ve ruined your entire career, the next step is bouncing back. That may be as simple as making your co-workers laugh the next time you see them or it may take a lot of time and dedication to right your wrongs. Either way, you’ll get through it and come out on the other end as a person who knows how to solve their own problems.

Working a little too hard at that new job? If you’re getting headaches, it could be a sign of eye strain. Here are six ways to prevent that.

Featured Image via Brazhyk / shutterstock.com

The post 5 Rookie Mistakes Nearly Every Budding Professional Makes (And How to Avoid Them) appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

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https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/business/5-rookie-mistakes-nearly-every-budding-professional-makes-and-how-to-avoid-them 2313040@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Tue, 20 Aug 2019 12:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[Creating a Polaroid Hero Section with Divi’s Transform Options]]> Creative hero sections make websites memorable and special. This polaroid hero section design evokes a sense of vintage wanderlust. By using column transform options, the polaroids can be arranged in any way you want, as if they were spread on a table.

You can recreate this polaroid hero section design with your own square images. You’ll be able to download the JSON file for free as well!

Let’s get to it.

Preview

Before we dive into the tutorial, let’s take a quick look at the outcome across different screen sizes.

Desktop

desktop preview polaroid hero

Mobile

mobile preview polaroid hero

Download The Polaroid Hero Section Design for FREE

To lay your hands on the free polaroid hero section design, you will first need to download it using the button below. To gain access to the download you will need to subscribe to our Divi Daily email list by using the form below. As a new subscriber, you will receive even more Divi goodness and a free Divi Layout pack every Monday! If you’re already on the list, simply enter your email address below and click download. You will not be “resubscribed” or receive extra emails.

Let’s Start Recreating

Add New Section

Start by adding a new section to the page you’re working on.

Bottom Divider

Add a mint green bottom divider.

  • Divider Placement: Bottom
  • Divider Style: #12
  • Divider Color: Mint Green #d2f2d0
  • Divider Height: 23vw

bottom divider in the section

Spacing

Adjust the section’s spacing.

  • Top Margin: 7vw
  • Bottom Margin: 0px
  • Top and Bottom Padding: 0px

section spacing settings

Add New Row

Column Structure

Continue by adding a new row to your section. Choose the following column structure:

add a 3 column structure

Sizing

Now, adjust the row’s sizing.

  • Use Custom Gutter Width: Yes
  • Gutter Width: 1
  • Width: 90vw
  • Max Width: 100%

row sizing settings polaroids

Spacing

Next, adjust the top and bottom padding in the spacing settings.

  • Top and Bottom Padding: 0px

top and bottom padding for the section

Display

Add one line of CSS code to the row’s main element to keep columns next to each other on smaller screen sizes.

  • Custom CSS – Main Element: display: flex;
display: flex;

custom css for the 3 column row

Add Image Module to Column 1

Upload Square Image

Add an image module to column 1 and upload a square image.

add an image module for polaroid

add a square image

Alignment

Now, adjust the module alignment.

  • Module Alignment: Center

module alignment image

Sizing

Then, make the module fullwidth.

  • Force Fullwidth: Yes

force fullwidth in the image module

Add Text Module to Column 1

Add Content

Add a text module and insert some content. We’ll use the word “polaroid.”

add text module polaroid

add polaroid content

Text

Style the text font.

  • Text Font: Advent Pro
  • Text Alignment: Center
  • Text Color: Very Dark Grey #474747
  • Text Size:
    • Desktop: 1vw
    • Tablet + Phone: 2vw
  • Text Letter Spacing: 0.1vw
  • Text Line Height: 1.8em

polaroid text

Sizing

Use ‘100%’ for the width in the sizing settings.

  • Width: 100%

text width

Spacing

Now adjust the spacing.

  • Top Margin: 1vw

margin text polaroid

Clone Modules Twice & Place Duplicates in Remaining Columns

duplicate and drag the modules

Change Image & Copy of Duplicates

Change the images in each duplicate image module. If your design calls for it, change the text content as well.

Column 1 Settings

Background

Continue by opening the column 1 settings of the row. Set the background to white to create the polaroid effect.

  • Background Color: White #ffffff

white polaroid background

Spacing

Add some bottom padding to create the wider polaroid bottom border.

  • Bottom Padding: 2vw

margin for the background of the column

Border

Add a border to finish the polaroid visual.

  • 4-Side Border Width: 1vw
  • Top Border Width: 2vw
  • Right Border Width: 2vw
  • Bottom Border Width: 1vw
  • Left Border Width: 2vw
  • Border Color: White #ffffff

polaroid white background

Box Shadow

Complete the column 1 settings by adding a subtle box shadow.

  • Box Shadow: #1

box shadow for the polaroid

Extend Column 1 Settings

Use the extend styles option to extend the column settings.

  • Go back to the main row settings window and click on the three dots to the right of the first column tab.
  • Select ‘extend item styles’ and select ‘throughout this row.’

extend item styles from column 1

throughout this row

Column 1 Transform Styles

Now, adjust the transform settings in the first column.

  • Transform Translate: x-axis -11vw, y-axis -6vw
  • Transform Rotate: 341 deg, 1st option

column transform

Column 2 Transform Styles

Next, adjust the transform settings for the second column.

  • Transform Translate: x-axis -22w, y-axis 0vw
  • Transform Rotate: 10 deg, 1st option

column 2 transform

Column 3 Transform Styles

Finally, adjust the transform settings for column three.

  • Transform Scale: 68% both axes
  • Transform Translate: x-axis -46w, y-axis 12vw
  • Transform Rotate: 31 deg, 1st option

column 3 transform

Add New Section

Background

Add a new section and apply a mint green background to the section.

  • Background Color: Mint Green #d2f2d0

insert section

add a mint green background

Bottom Divider

Give the section a bottom divider.

  • Divider Placement: Bottom
  • Divider Style: #12
  • Divider Color: White #ffffff
  • Divider Height: 23vw

bottom divider on second section

Spacing

Remove the default top padding.

  • Top Padding: 0px

section padding 0px

Add New Row

Column Structure

Continue by adding a new row with 3 columns.

add new 3 col row

Copy and Paste Row Styles

Using the wireframe view, copy and paste the row styles from the first section

  • First, click on the three dots to the right of the row menu inside the first section. Select ‘copy row styles’.
  • Then, click on the three dots on the right of the row menu in the second section. Select ‘paste row styles’.

copy row styles from section one

paste row styles

Copy and Paste Column Settings

Now, copy the column settings in the first row and paste them onto columns 1 and 2 in the new row.

  • First, open the row settings in the first row.
  • Second, click on the three dots on the right side of the first column tab and select ‘copy item styles’.
  • Then, scroll down to the new row and open the settings tab.
  • Finally, click on the three dots on the right side of the first column and select ‘paste item styles’.

copy item styles again

paste item styles

Column 1 Transform Styles

Now, adjust the transform styles in column 1.

  • Transform Scale: 75% both axes
  • Transform Translate: x-axis -8w, y-axis -14vw
  • Transform Rotate: 35 deg 1st option

transform settings in column 1

Column 2 Transform Styles

Then, modify the transform styles in column 2.

  • Transform Translate: x-axis -17w, y-axis 2vw
  • Transform Rotate: 346 deg 1st option

column 2 settings

Add Image Modules

Duplicate and Drag Image Modules

Now, go back to wireframe view to duplicate and drag two image modules.

  • First, duplicate the first image module in the first section twice.
  • Then, drag them to the first and second columns of the second section.
  • Change the image in each module for a new square image.

duplicate and drag image modules

Add Text Modules

Duplicate and Drag Text Modules

After the images, do the same with the text modules. Duplicate from the first section and drag into the second section.

  • In the wireframe view, duplicate the text module from the first column in the first section twice.
  • Now, drag the new text modules to columns 1 and 2 in the second section.
  • If you wish to change the content, do so now.

duplicate and drag text modules

Add Text Module to Column 3

Add Content

Click on the plus symbol in the third column and add a text module. Insert some H2 and paragraph content.

add a text module on column 3

making memories text module

Text

Style the text as follows.

  • Text Font: Advent Pro
  • Text Alignment: Center
  • Text Color: Dark Grey #848484
  • Text Size:
    • Desktop: 1vw
    • Tablet + Phone: 1.9vw
  • Text Letter Spacing: 0.1vw
  • Text Line Height:
    • Desktop: 1.2em
    • Tablet + Phone: 1.3em

text settings column 3

Heading Text

Now, style the H2 text.

  • Heading: H2
  • H2 Font: Adamina
  • H2 Font Weight: Bold
  • H2 Font Color: Very Dark Grey #444444
  • H2 Font Size:
    • Desktop: 2vw
    • Tablet + Phone: 3vw
  • H2 Letter Spacing: 4px
  • H2 Line Height:
    • Desktop: 1.7vw
    • Tablet + Phone: 1.5vw

h2 settings column three

Sizing

Then, adjust the sizing.

  • Width:
    • Desktop: 60%
    • Tablet: 91%
    • Phone: 100%
  • Module Alignment: Center

text settings

Spacing

Finally, adjust the spacing.

  • Top Margin: -12vw

top margin making memories

Add Button Module to Column 3

Add Copy

Click on the plus symbol below the text and add a button module. Add some copy to the button.

add a button

find out more in the button

Alignment

Change the button alignment.

  • Alignment: Center

button alignment

Custom Button Styles

Style the button accordingly.

  • Button Text Size:
    • Desktop: 1vw
    • Tablet: 2.4vw
    • Phone: 2.3vw
  • Button Border Width: 0px
  • Button Text Color: Black #000000
  • Button Letter Spacing: 4px
  • Button Font: Advent Pro
  • Button Font Weight: Bold

button styles

Spacing

Apply a top margin value.

  • Top Margin: 2vw

top margin in button

Add Divider Module to Column 3

Visibility

Below the button, add a divider and style the as follows.

  • Visibility: Yes

divider visibility

Line

Give the divider a bright green color.

  • Line Color: #55f252

divider color settings

Sizing

Change the sizing settings of the divider and you’re done!

  • Divider Weight
    • Desktop: 7px
    • Tablet + Phone: 4px
  • Width:
    • Desktop: 10%
    • Tablet + Phone: 30%
  • Module Alignment: Center

divider settings col3

Preview

Let’s take a look again at the finished design of the polaroid hero section across different screen sizes.

Desktop

desktop preview polaroid hero

Mobile

mobile preview polaroid hero

It’s a Wrap!

In this post, we showed you how to recreate a polaroid hero section using Divi’s transform options. This is a great way to showcase multiple images in your page’s hero section. We hope this design will inspire your own creative hero section designs! If you have any questions, make sure you leave a comment in the comment section below.

The post Creating a Polaroid Hero Section with Divi’s Transform Options appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

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https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/creating-a-polaroid-hero-section-with-divis-transform-options 2311770@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Sun, 18 Aug 2019 16:00:47 GMT
<![CDATA[7 Divi Layouts for Musicians]]> Divi is an excellent theme for musicians and anyone providing musical services. Fortunately, you don’t have to start from scratch when making your music-focused website with Divi. In this article, we’ll look at 7 Divi layouts for musicians to help you get a head start on your next Divi project.

These layouts are great for websites for those who perform live music, DJ events (of course this is different from being a musician but the needs of the site are virtually the same), sell their music through their websites, teach music classes, and lots more. The list includes both free and premium layouts. They’re in no particular order.

1. Musicalz

Musicalz was designed for musicians a music teachers. It comes with four pages that include home, instructors, the process, and contact. The home page shows a full-width image with a title and tagline to one side. A styled newsletter form sits just below this and has a curved designed that creates a swoosh across the screen. The swoosh section separators continue throughout the site. A CTA displays information and a button to one side and two images that overlap on the other over a musically patterned background. A similar CTA follows this design with an alternating layout. Classes are shows as services within blurbs. A styled contact form sits above a background pattern above a keyboard. The Instructors page includes styled person modules. The process page has an interesting timeline.

Price: $49.95 | More Information

2. Music Studio

Music Studio was designed with music teachers in mind. It comes with 5 pages including home, studio, equipment, musicians, and contact. The home page shows a full-screen image with a title and tagline to the far right side. It’s separated from the next section with an angled separator. The next section shows information and images of the studio followed by a full-width CTA, number counters, and a contact button. The equipment page includes styled pricing tables. The Musicians page shows the teachers within styled testimonial modules. Each of the pages contains a similar hero section as the home page but each has their own images. It includes free images from Pixabay.

Price: Free | More Information

3. Divi Music

Divi Music is a one-page layout with special features for the Fullwidth Header Extended module and Perky Animate plugins. Of course, the layout works fine without them, but it wouldn’t have those special features. The Hero section displays a full-screen background image with a deep purple overlay and an animated wavy section. The foreground shows the title, tagline, and button. A section for songs embeds music videos as cards with thick borders, titles, and a tilt effect if you add the plugin. A CTA section shows an album cover with a description and a button to make a purchase. A full-width CTA in the footer provides text for the description on one side and a button on the other side to make a purchase.

Price: Free | More Information

4. DJ Layout

DJ Layout was designed for anyone who provides music for events. It’s a one-page layout (the page says child theme, but I did confirm that it is a layout that’s imported into the Divi library). The hero section includes a full-screen background image in parallax. The overlay includes the logo, news about the next event, title, tagline, button to book an event, and social follow buttons. The next section includes styled audio players to play sample tracks. A services section shows the types of events within a multi-column layout. It also includes a styled newsletter form with social buttons, pricing tables, and a contact section with information and a contact form. The sections include large text and dark overlays.

Price: $29 | More Information

5. Dream Music

Dream Music is a one-page layout for musicians, music teachers, and music stores. The hero section includes a full-screen background with a dark blue overlay. The overlay includes the logo, title, tagline, and two buttons. The next section displays a slim opt-in form with angled separators for the top and bottom to create a swoosh. A section for services displays blurbs over a background of sheet music with a blue overlay similar to the hero section. This section includes a title with text for information about the services. The footer includes a section of information and a contact form.

Price: $5 | More Information

6. Music Collection

Music Collection is a one-page layout that focuses on albums and music tracks. It includes a styled title section with an image, title, and section separators. Under this is three sections of tracks- each one for a different album. Each of the sections focuses on a different color style and include different separators. These sections include a column with an album title, number of songs, file size, album cover, and information about the album. The album cover includes box shadow effects. Next to this is a row with embedded audio tracks using styled audio player modules and a matching button to download the album. This is excellent for musicians wanting to provide sample tracks and a link to the full album.

Price: Free | More Information

7. DJ Layout Pack

DJ Layout Pack is a 7-page layout pack for any type of creative professional and works great for both live and recorded music. Pages include landing, home, about, contact, events, music, and services. It includes lots of gradient backgrounds and large text. The landing page includes a list of events in the hero section. Embedded audio players play the latest tracks. A list of tour dates includes the location and buttons to see more information and purchase tickets. The music page includes the embedded audio players and adds albums with covers. The Events page displays the next event with a countdown timer and button to purchase tickets. The list of events grays out past events. The home page adds a detailed list of tour dates and adds a button to see the full calendar.

Price: Free | More Information

Ending Thoughts

That’s our look at 7 Divi layouts for musicians. Among them, you’ll find features to sell your music, provide a list of tracks as samples of your music, provide music services for live events, inform about upcoming events, provide music lessons, and more. No matter what type of features you need, there’s sure to be something here to help with your next Divi project.

We want to hear from you. Have you tried any of these Divi layouts for musicians? Let us know what you think about them in the comments.

Featured Image via TeraVector / shutterstock.com

The post 7 Divi Layouts for Musicians appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

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https://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/divi-resources/divi-layouts-for-musicians 2310954@rssreader.neilforker.com/fever Fri, 16 Aug 2019 16:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[Getting the Stink Out of Your Shoes]]>

There are more sweat glands in your two feet than anywhere else on your body. And when bacteria breaks down that sweat, it can stink. (That’s right — it’s not the bacteria itself that stinks.) 

Because of all the sweat from your feet, which inevitably soaks into your shoes, stinky footwear is a rather common occurrence. While in some cases it’s a minor annoyance that really only impacts yourself, in others it’s a truly embarrassing matter — people can smell it if they’re simply sitting next to you on the subway, and if you take your shoes off around folks, the stink can bowl them over!

The amount you sweat and the pungency of your body odor is partially genetic, and if you’re on the more stinky end of things, you’ll just unfortunately have to do more to fight it (and prevent it). 

Below you’ll find how to do just that. We start with a handful of tips focused on prevention, and then move into a number of mostly natural options you can try before you’re forced to throw your permanently putrid footwear in an incinerator.

Prevention (Foot + Shoe Care) 

The first part of eliminating stinky shoes is preventing the problem before it can ever take root in the first place. Utilize the below tips to keep your feet and shoes stink-free. 

1. Maintain a foot care routine. Stinky shoes start with stinky feet. Wash your feet every day, and no, letting the suds from washing your torso drip down to your feet doesn’t count; actually wash your dogs deliberately with a washcloth and soap. If your feet are really a problem, wash them even on days you might not shower. Also exfoliate with a pumice stone; the bottoms of your feet, especially at the heels, are obviously epicenters of the kind of calloused crevasses in which bacteria like to hide. Give your feet some antibacterial lotion after showering too.  

Simply washing your feet each day can in many cases eliminate foot smell, and the stinky shoes that follow, altogether. 

2. Treat athlete’s foot/fungus. Your feet stank may be caused not by bacteria, but by fungus. Athlete’s foot (a fungal infection) and toenail fungus are two manifestations of such, and while they’re not the same thing, they often appear together. While it’s not in the purview of this particular piece to go into treatments for these infections, there are a number of things you can do to curb these foot troubles, from over-the-counter powders/creams, to prescription treatments, and DIY remedies. Treating these toe and toenail problems will go a long way towards decreasing foot and shoe odor. 

3. Rotate the shoes you wear. This is a tip you’ll often see when it comes to taking care of shoes and extending their lifespan, and it’s equally applicable for the sake of eliminating odor. Again, your feet sweat. A lot. When you wear the same shoes 8+ hours per day, for multiple days in a row, that footwear never has a chance to completely dry or air out. So you just keep adding moisture, and adding moisture, and adding moisture. Instead, give shoes a full day or two to air out and breathe a little. Didn’t know you needed an excuse to buy new shoes, did you?  

4. Maintain a shoe care routine. In addition to rotating your shoes, be sure to clean them properly when you do wear them. After a long day, give them a quick sweep with an antibacterial wipe (or use the homemade spray mentioned below) as soon as you kick ‘em off, thereby beating bacteria before it takes hold. Wash the insoles on the regular (more on that below too). Give dirty shoes a wipe with a damp paper towel; dirt and grime can stink when broken down, just as sweat can. Using cedar shoe trees ensures effective air circulation, and absorbs some moisture as well. The bottom line: taking care of your shoes is a great way to keep them from stinking. 

5. Wear sweat-sucking socks. There are a lot of socks out there these days that have sweat-wicking properties. Invest in them. No need to stick with the lame cotton whities that you get in bulk at Walmart. Whether it’s a low-cut performance sock or a heavy duty wool option, the socks you wear can make a big difference. 

It should go without saying that going sockless in shoes is a recipe for stank. Sometimes though, like with boat shoes, you’re going to wear them sans socks. In those cases, just be especially sure that you’re washing your feet each day, that you’re giving your shoes an antibacterial wipe down at the end of the day (though not with leather, as the alcohol can dry out the material; instead use the homemade spray below), and that your shoes get ample airing between wears. 

Extermination 

Okay, now that we know some things about prevention, let’s look at some tips for getting rid of the smell once it’s already infiltrated your shoes. Depending on the level of stink, it’s possible that a single option will do the trick, or you may need to utilize many of them. 

1. Throw (some of) your shoes in the washer. Fabric and canvas shoes can usually be cleaned in a clothes washer. Either look at the tag or Google your particular brand/shoe. A gentle cycle with cool water is often what’s recommended. Drying in the dryer creates an annoying racket, and can damage the shoes, or the drum, so stuff them with balled up wads of newspaper (which you replace as they become saturated) and/or just leave them in the sun to dry, which also eliminates bacteria . . . 

2. Take advantage of UV power! The sun’s UV rays naturally kill bacteria. (That’s why sunlight can purify water.) You don’t want to leave leather/suede shoes in direct, hot sunlight for extended periods of time, but they can handle it for an afternoon. And other materials are fine for whatever you want to do. Unlace, lift up the tongue as much as you can, and leave them be. It may not exterminate stink fully, but it’ll definitely eliminate some of it, and it’s obviously totally natural and free.   

3. Use baking soda (or kitty litter). While you can buy a specially formulated powder (see below), there are a couple things you might already have in your home that could do the trick just as well. The classic is baking soda, which is universally known to absorb and neutralize odors. You can just toss powder directly into your shoe, but then you have to clean it out (if you don’t, it will clump into gritty sludge the next time you sweat in your shoes). The better option is to put some in a sock; the porousness allows the soda to still work and doesn’t make nearly as much of a mess. Kitty litter does the same thing if you happen to have some in the house. Just be careful employing these methods with leather/suede, as it can dry out those materials if used too much. 

4. Use homemade spray. As with powder, there are dozens of foot and shoe sprays you can buy, but this homemade version is wayyy cheaper and far more natural. It’s especially useful for leather/suede shoes that can’t be thrown in the washer. 

The recipe: 

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 5 drops of tea tree oil

Mix it all up in a small spray bottle and you’re set. Spray it inside your shoes when they’ve become offensive. Also use it as a preventative action once you’ve taken your shoes off after a long day.  

5. Put in dryer sheets overnight. Fabric softener sheets not only smell nice, but they also neutralize odors. That little sheet is actually a chemical-laden stink-stopping bomb. While they’re not actually good for your clothing or dryers, they can work wonders in a stinky shoe. (In a dryer, the chemicals in the sheet are melting and spreading throughout the clothing; in a shoe, you don’t have to worry about that.) Ball one or two up and stick them in each shoe overnight. 

6. Wash the insoles. Some insoles are machine-washable. Check the manufacturer website. Others need handwashing in either a soapy bucket or a water/vinegar mix. If you’re not sure or can’t find the info, go with the latter method. As alluded to above, washing them every 2-4 weeks can also be part of your ongoing maintenance routine. 

7. For minor problems, try essential oils and/or citrus peels. If the smell of your shoes is more of a minor annoyance than a truly embarrassing problem, you can go with this easy route. You have some essential oils left over from that DIY beard oil, right? Put about 5 drops of tea tree, lemon, or lavender oil (those are my favorites at least) right into the shoe. It’ll help quite a bit with the smell — though it won’t kill all the bacteria. Citrus peels, which contain a lot of natural essential oils, can do the same thing. Stick a peel or two in the shoes overnight and see what happens.

8. Consider commercial powders/sprays/products. There are a bajillion products out there designed to kill foot/shoe stank. Most are kind of spendy, and tend to include all the same moisture-absorbing/antibacterial ingredients and also essential oils/fragrances to make them smell nice. These are sort of a one-stop shop if that’s how you want to go. But, you can save a lot of money and use less harsh chemicals with the other methods above. 

For a chem-free but turnkey solution, we’ve found success with these StankStix — they absorb moisture and eliminate odors, and you just have to slide them into your shoes and let them sit.

Related Articles

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<![CDATA[Atomic Design: Blowing Up What You Thought You Knew About Web Design]]> It’s a common belief that flexibility is the same as being unrestrained, that to be creative you also have to be unbridled. To complete a project, though, especially one that’s as intricate as web design, creating structure can actually give you more flexibility. You need a framework – it’s non-negotiable. Flexing your artistic, creative muscles where you truly have the freedom to will result in designs that are as inspired as they are functional and realistic. Atomic design is a sensical, methodical approach to web design that still gives you the chance to experiment within the framework.

Design Systems

Designers don’t simply create web pages anymore; they create design systems. Design systems include:

  • Color
  • Grids
  • Texture
  • Typography
  • Etc.

I love how Jack Strachan over at UX Planet describes design systems: “In short, a design system is a collection of reusable components, guided by clear standards, that can be assembled together to build any number of applications. Design systems are a method to translate a consistent experience and visual language across a product when working on different touch-points.”

Elements of design can be subjective, and they can quickly become overwhelming and chaotic. In order to categorize them, design has to be looked at in a more methodical way. That’s what web designer Brad Frost did.

The Birth of Atomic Design

Here’s how Brad came up with atomic design: “In searching for inspiration and parallels, I kept coming back to chemistry. The thought is that all matter (whether solid, liquid, gas, simple, complex, etc.) is comprised of atoms. Those atomic units bond together to form molecules, which in turn combine into more complex organisms to ultimately create all matter in our universe.”

He goes on to explain that interfaces are made up of components that can be categorized into building blocks. Here’s the order from smallest to largest:

  • Atoms
  • Molecules
  • Organisms
  • Templates
  • Pages
atomic design

Source: BradFrost.com

The Building Blocks of Atomic Design

The main draw of atomic design is that it promotes consistency. Many of the elements you create can be easily replicated, reused or scaled. And to keep track of them all, designers can build themselves a library where they can see all of their elements and styles in one place. There’s some room for customization, too, but only as the building blocks get more complex and grander in scope. Let’s get into the five building blocks:

1. Atoms

As atoms are to matter in the natural world, HTML tags are to web interfaces. Meaning: all web interfaces begin with HTML tags or fundamental elements (animations, buttons, color palettes, fonts, form labels, etc.). While these atoms aren’t beneficial to web design on their own, they are required to build the web interface.

atomic design

2. Molecules

Molecules are more complex than atoms, but they’re not complex overall. When you group not-so-useful atoms together, you have more-useful molecules: Search Form Label + Input + Button (atoms) = Completed Search Form (molecule)

atomic design

3. Organisms

When you group molecules together, you get organisms, which are more complex than their predecessors: Logo + Navigation + Search Form + Social Media Icons (molecules) = Completed Masthead (organism)

atomic design

Ideally, you’ll be able to reuse organisms on the website or across different websites, keeping the general layout and customizing it with different text and images. For example, you may use the same type of masthead on all the websites you design, or you may create a product-specific organism (image + title + price) that you repeat on the product page.

This is when the web interface truly starts to shape up in a unique, customized way. Before now, your interface is just a collection of plain elements. During the organisms stage, the website becomes more visual.

atomic design

If you were to share your process with a client, this is the part where they’d go, “Oh, I get it.” This is the time to start wireframing or put together mockups so the client can give you feedback before you get further along.

4. Templates

When you group organisms together, you have templates. This is when the actual page layout comes together. While molecules and organisms have their own, internal layouts, the templates stage is when you start seeing how they complement and interact with one another; where they’re placed in regard to one another; and how they flow as a whole. The template gives the molecules and organisms context. Note that templates have placeholder content, not custom or original content.

atomic design

Source: BradFrost.com

5. Pages

Pages take templates to the next level by replacing the placeholder content with actual content. It probably won’t be the final content, but it will be more representative of the final design and content. Adding high-quality, permanent content at this point could be a waste because the website still has to be tested, reviewed and tweaked. That said, it’s possible that you will plug in the finalized content – it depends on where you are in that process.

This is the stage where the website will be under the most scrutiny. Depending on the reviews and feedback you get, molecules, organisms and templates may have to be changed. This is also a good time to test design variations.

Final Thoughts

The thing about atomic design is that it’s not new – the verbiage is, but the theory isn’t. This is how websites have been designed for a long time now. Speaking in atomic design terms won’t automatically make you a great designer or developer; it’s not a replacement for solid work.

One benefit of speaking about it this way, in using this sort of terminology to clarify the methodology, is that’s is easier for non-developers to understand – you can explain your process to clients. And for the organized developer, it’s a way to compartmentalize designs. You’ll be able to drill down into one component or a small grouping of elements that aren’t working. It can help you view the forest for the trees instead of saying, “This whole thing is flawed.”

Atomic design allows you to embrace creativity without getting lost in it. It wrangles basic elements and design systems in a way that gets you started on a project faster so that time can be spent where your artistry and skills are needed most – making intricate adaptions, solving problems, meeting client needs and ultimately creating a website that goes beyond the norm.

Keep up that web design momentum and check out 10 Rules of Good UI Design to Follow On Every Web Design Project.

Featured Image via ShadeDesign / shutterstock.com

The post Atomic Design: Blowing Up What You Thought You Knew About Web Design appeared first on Elegant Themes Blog.

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